SPACE Exploration

GIFTED UNIT

Uses problem solving, research, and experimentation to study space travel and solar system

curriculum not included in their regular classrooms while also developing broad-based

concepts of exploration in areas other than space.

 Week 1

Essential Question:  Why has space exploration been so important to the success of the human race? In what patterns do the stars and planets align in the night sky?

S5CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Overview of Space Exploration

   Observing the Universe

  Tools of the Trade:  Telescopes and binoculars, observatories and planetariums, probes,

       satellites, space laboratories and manned space missions

   The Sun 

   The Stars

   Asteroids and Comets

The Planets Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto

   The Moons

    Astronauts

    Space Stations 

Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Introduction to Space Exploration

     Opening the Unit:  Observing the Universe

        Early Ideas About Space- The Questioners

        The Solar System 

        The Milky Way

 Activities in Class:

     TSW in groups will complete research and create powerpoints on famous astronomers and   

           their contributions.

     Claudius Ptolemy

     Tycho Brahe

     Nicolaus Copernicus

     Johannes Kepler

     Galileo Galilei

     William Herschel

     Sir Isaac Newton

     Christian Huygens

     Edwin Hubble

  Powerpoint on the Galaxy and the Solar System 

      http://science.pppst.com/space/constellations.html

  Online Activities: 

      Space Flight Simulation Gamehttp://orbit.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/

      Online Games   http://www.kidsastronomy.com/index.htm

      NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

      NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 Book: Can You Hear a Shout in Space?: Questions and Answers About Space Exploration 629.4 BER Berger, Melvin

 Art Activity:  Glitter Galaxy

    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/astronomy/glittergalaxy/

 Space Jeopardy Games http://library.thinkquest.org/4236/game-index.htm

 Video:  Discovery Education Earth Science Space Exploration

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=70515248-BFA9-4F57-A7CB-F400A3545BB7&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

       The Magic School Bus Gets Lost in Space

 http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=AF40E416-58AE-426C-BABF-2A7140DAED7A&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY: 

     Begin a Search for Aliens on Earth

     http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/7068765/The-search-for-aliens-should-start-on-Earth-not-outer-space-says-scientist.html

 Project Assignment:  Make a model of the Solar System due Week 4.     

Week 2

Essential Question:  What ‘tools’ have been used to further space exploration?

 S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

Overview of Space Exploration

   Observing the Universe

  Tools of the Trade:  Telescopes and binoculars, observatories and planetariums, probes,

       satellites, and space laboratories.

 Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Book:  Telescopes by Lionel Bender 522-BEN

 

      The Hubble Space Telescope by Diane M. Sipiera 522-SIP

 

Space Online Games

     The Magic School Bus Space Chase

     http://www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/games/space/index.htm

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 Art Activity:  TSW will create their own telescopes.

Video: Mission Critical:  Hubble

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/?guidAssetId=eec331db-6084-4657-a00d-32bcb5215587

     The Observatories at Machu Picchu
http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=6B5C2559-D688-4381-A992-F3AF5F28CB4B&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

Video: Greatest Discoveries with Bill Nye: Astronomy

              http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=04744E86-BA58-4DD9-BE32-32BAAD2E8C1D&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Space Jeopardy Games

http://www.hardin.k12.ky.us/res_techn/countyjeopardygames.htm

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:

     The Space Files

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/?guidAssetId=9f68e796-fe53-42ce-bf51-39da747dad76  

Week 3

Essential Question: Why is the Sun so essential to life in this solar system?

 

 S2E2. Students will investigate the position of sun and moon to show patterns throughout the year.

 Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:  Sun by Lynda Sorensen  523.7

              Arrow to the Sun: A Pueblo Indian Tale by Gerald McDermott  398.2 MCD

               How the Sun Was Brought Back to the Sky by Mirra Ginsburg  398.2 GIN

               I Can Hear the Sun:  A Modern Myth by Patricia Polacco  E POL

               Who Will Be the Sun? A North American Indian Folktale  398 TRO

 Art Activity:  TSW make a clay necklace of the Sun.

 Online Simulation:  Total Solar Eclipse: Live From Turkey

http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/2006/index.html?gclid=CPfS04WYxasCFYTs7QodyyU-7Q

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 Activity:  In groups students will prepare and perform plays based on the four mythological stories about the Sun (above).

 Video:  The Sun 

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=5B77EA2A-41F0-4CD9-9754-0355C1F9199D&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Powerpoint on the Sun  http://science.lotsoflessons.com/space/sun.html

Art Activity: 

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY: 

How the Universe Works:  Alien Solar Systems

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=1A3C4AC7-E530-4ACB-B5CC-C11ADBCEB838&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US  

Week 4

Essential Question:  How do the Stars Create the Constellations and Galaxies in the Solar System?

S4E1. Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns, and planets.

Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:  Stars Beneath Your Bed:  the Surprising Story of Dust by April Sayre 

              The Magic School Bus Sees Stars by Nancy White  523.8 COL

              There’s a Great Bear in the Sky and Other Facts About Stars by Helen Taylor 523.8 TAY

 Language Arts:  Pendemonium Star Words

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=A5E1B8A1-B919-4439-9D6E-68383852C4A5&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Art Activity:  Cascading Star Mobile

  http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/stars/cascadeofstars/

  Video:  How the Universe Works:  Extreme Stars

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=61EA66E0-559B-4E6A-9B26-060396128B46&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

      The Magic School Bus Sees Stars

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=5615365B-1670-45F2-9788-F453107C025B&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

      VideoMath:  Star Designs

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=7F907DF0-97E8-47B6-8703-3AB6B03CAC7A&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Powerpoint on Stars  http://science.pppst.com/space/stars.html

Powerpoint on the Constellations   http://science.pppst.com/space/constellations.html

   Online Games:  NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

     Bob the Alien’s Tour of the Solar System

http://www.bobthealien.co.uk/voyager.htm

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:

How the Universe Works:  Alien Galaxy

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=7976C2D6-1CAD-4C76-A932-9AC060D5D915&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

Week 5

Essential Question:  Where does our Planet Fit into the Solar System?

S4E1. Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns, and planets.

Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 

Books:  Planets and Galaxies by Dan Mackie 523.1 MAC

              Our Planet Earth by Claire Llewellyn  REF 550 OUR

             

Art Activity:  Stained Glass Picture of Earth

 Video:  How the Planet Works:  Extreme Planets

      http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=644EFF09-EBB9-410C-B74A-FC2B24E84A52&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Discovery Education The Story of the Solar System

             http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=4C37092C-481F-42D7-9525-B62ACFB25C2B&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Powerpoint Presentation:  http://science.pppst.com/space/solarsystem.html

 Online Games: 

     Alien:  Assembly Required

http://pbskids.org/arthur/games/alien/alien.html

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

      NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY: 

Reading Rainbow: Beegu

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=2DEEDB03-9260-4941-AE1B-C3A04E3CB1C5&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

  Project Assignment:  Create a Galaxy in Outer Space.

 

Week 6

Essential Question:  How do the moons partner with their perspective planets?

S4E2. Students will model the position and motion of the earth in the solar system and will explain the role of relative position and motion in determining sequence of the phases of the moon.

 Topics for Discussion:

     The Moon as a Companion

     Inside the Moon

     The Phases of the Moon

      The Seasons and Tides

     Eclipses

     The Lunar Surface of the Moon

     Man on the Moon July 20, 1969

     Last Luna probe on the Moon in 1976

     Japan’s Hiten probe in 1990 and future missions to the Moon

 Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:

The Moon by Martha Rustad 523.3

Half a Moon and One Whole Star by Crescent Dragonwagon  E DRA

 

Art Activity: Model Clay Planets
Mix two colors of model clay together. Stop mixing when you get a marbled look. For texture, poke and shape the surface with a craft stick, plastic fork, or pencil.

 Activities in Class:

     The Lunar Prospector Hands-on Activities

     http://lunar.arc.nasa.gov/education/activities/index.htm

      NASA the Spirit of Discovery Activities

     http://www2.semo.edu/mast/mlc/moon.htm

  Powerpoint on the Phases of the Moon

     http://www.wsanford.com/~wsanford/gr8ps/05_blue/extras/Space-Science-for-Teachers_UVa/Phases-of-the-Moon.pdf

 Activity:  Is the Great Wall of China Visible from Space?

     http://space.about.com/od/fungamesandhumor/ss/Great_Wall.htm

 Online Activities: 

     Moon Games  http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/everything/moon/games/

     Kids Astronomy.com  http://www.kidsastronomy.com/astroskymap/constellations.htm

      Space Flight Simulation Gamehttp://orbit.medphys.ucl.ac.uk/

      Online Games   http://www.kidsastronomy.com/index.htm

      NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

      NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 Art Activity:  Phases of the Moon

   http://www.dltk-teach.com/rhymes/moon/mphases.htm

 Space Jeopardy Games http://library.thinkquest.org/4236/game-index.htm

 Video:  In the Shadow of the Moon

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=5E182CEA-4DF0-4970-A221-05C74FF62768&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

       The Magic School Bus Gets Lost in Space

 http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=AF40E416-58AE-426C-BABF-2A7140DAED7A&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Math:  Space Math Smarty Games

http://www.smartygames.com/igre/math/mathShoot.html

 

Homework Topics on Space: 

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/homework-topics-index.html#r

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Phases of the Moon

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/time/moon/phases.html

http://www.universetoday.com/20579/moon-activities-for-kids/

Week 7

Essential Question:  How do the ‘Mysterious Visitors’ from Space (Asteroids, Comets and Meteorites) explain the death of stars and planets in our solar system?

 S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

 Topics for Discussion:  Asteroids, Comets and Meteorites

 

S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

 Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Powerpoint on Being a Space Kid

     http://science.pppst.com/space/moon.html

 Powerpoint on Asteroids and the Asteroid Belt

    http://science.pppst.com/space/asteroids.html

 

Book:  Asteroids, Comets and Meteorites by Gregory Vogt 523.6 VOG

 Space Online Games

     The Magic School Bus Space Chase

     http://www.scholastic.com/magicschoolbus/games/space/index.htm

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 Art Activity:  Star or Planet Suncatcher
Form a pipe cleaner into a star or planet. Press it flat on a piece of parchment paper or plastic. Pour some white glue into a paper cup and add a few drops of paint. Mix with a craft stick. Pour the mixture into the form and sprinkle some glitter on it. Let it dry clear at least 24 hours. Gently pull the form from the paper or plastic and attach a ribbon or yarn to make a hanger.

Video: A Spin Around the Solar System

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=BD722E4D-32D2-4342-B475-F031BFDC4EEC&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Video: The Space Files-Comets

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/?guidAssetId=b75726bc-62f0-49e0-8f58-0292b752ac63

 Video:  The Magic School Bus Out of This World (in library)

     AVM/VIDEO 523 MAG

 Space Jeopardy Games

http://www.hardin.k12.ky.us/res_techn/countyjeopardygames.htm

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  Students Make their Own Comets

http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/s_system/acm.shtml 

Week 8

Essential Question: What are the Requirements For Astronauts To Live and Work in Space?

 Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:  Astronauts at Work by Deborah Shearer  629.45 SHE

            Astronaut Living in Space by Kate Hayden 629.47 HAY

            Space Missions by Deborah Shearer 629.47 SHE

           Christa McAuliffe: Teacher in Space by Connie Naden B NCA

 Math:  Calculating Space: Space Rocket by John Burnstein 526 BUR

Online Simulation: 

     Funschool Space http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/space/

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

     NASA Station Space Walk Game

               http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/3d_resources/station_spacewalk_game.html

 Activity:  NASA Career Corner-Want a Career at NASA?

          http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/career/index.html

 Video:  The Nasa Space Station (in library)

     AVM/VIDEO 808.83 THE

 Astronaut Powerpoint for Class Presentation   http://science.pppst.com/space/astronauts.html

  Art Activity:  Space Walls

  • Many children have glow-in-the dark celestial stickers on their ceilings and walls, but you can help them decorate their rooms with colorful, original works of space art. You just need some glow-in-the dark paint and dark-colored canvas or denim. Paint the solar system, complete with the sun at the center, asteroids and moons around each planet. You also can paint a rocket with your child peering out the window and flags on various planets, marking where your child has explored. You can then tack this artwork up on the wall or make original curtains from it.

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  Your Weight on Other Worlds

http://www.exploratorium.edu/ronh/weight/index.html

 

Week 9

Essential Question: How Have Space Stations Changed the Future?

Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:  Space Stations Cities of the Future? by Tristan Bancks KIT 372.4 SPA

              Space Machines by  Norman Barrett  629.4

              Space Robots by Gregory Vogt  629.4 VOG

             Space Suits by Deborah Shearer 629.4 SHE

              Space Stations Cities of the Future by Tristan Bancks  KIT 372.4 BAN

          Astronaut: Living in Space by Kate Hayden 629.47HAY

 Language Arts: TSW write a story based on their lives on a space station located on the planet of Mars.

Art Activity:  Homemade Rocket Ship

  • Building a real rocket ship is out of the question for the average child, and toy rockets are expensive. However, you can make a simple, easy space rocket with a cardboard toilet paper tube and a cone-shaped paper cup. Simply glue the cup to one end of the cardboard tube. Cover the other end of the tube with a white paper circle. Cut three wedge-shaped sails from some scrap cardboard and glue them around the base of the rocket, splitting the cylinder into equal thirds. Spray paint the whole thing white and embellish it with red and black stripes.

   Video:  Adventures in Space: The Pilots and the Astronauts

     http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=451376F7-BE29-4E9C-B13F-C856B6249FCA&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 Math: How Do Astronauts Use Math in Their Jobs?

     http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=273

 Online Activities:

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

     NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

     Bob the Alien’s Tour of the Solar System

http://www.bobthealien.co.uk/voyager.htm

 

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY: Building an International Space Station

http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schooladventures/spacestation/

Week 10

Essential Question:  What is the Future of Space Exploration?

Space Vocabulary For Students

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

 Books:  The Space Shuttle by Allison Lassieur 629.44 LAS

             Can You Hear a Shout in Space? Melvin Bergin BER 629.4

Art Activity: Solar System Necklace

  • This craft is appropriate for all ages and helps budding space explorers picture what the planets look like and how they are ordered in space. Simply take a few different colors of iridescent self-hardening clay for each planet and roll them together to create colorful balls. For the Earth, for instance, roll together white, blue and green clay. Make sure each planet is relatively close to scale size, with Jupiter as the largest and Mercury as the smallest. Push a toothpick through each ball to make a bead hole. Let the beads harden and string them onto beading wire, with the sun in the center and black beads between each planet. Embellish the necklace further with volcanic bead chips as asteroids and pewter star or rocket ship charms.

 

Video:  Earth Science: Space Exploration  http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=70515248-BFA9-4F57-A7CB-F400A3545BB7&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

 

Powerpoint Presentation:  http://science.pppst.com/space/spacetravel.html

 

Online Games: 

     NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

      NASA Image of the Day Gallery  http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  Buzz Lightyear and Beyond!

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Buzz_Lightyear_Connect_It.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/space/universe/exploration/  

 

 

 

 

SPACE UNIT

ANTICIPATION GUIDE

Yes or No?
 

1.    There are nine planets in the solar system.

 

2.   There are rocks floating around in space.

 

3.   There are two Milky Way galaxies.

 

4.   The sun can cause electrical appliances to blink out.

 

5.   The space program in the U.S. is now defunct.

                                                                          

6.   The atoms of life on our planet are originally from pieces of other planets.

 

7.   NASA stands for National Air and Space Administration.

 

8.   Aliens exist in other galaxies.

 

9.   One kid has actually flown in a spaceship.

                                                                                                   


 

SAGE SPACE EXPLORATION UNIT

GPS STANDARDS

 

Walk on the Moon

 

1st through 5th Grade  – Math Process Standards

Students will solve problems (using appropriate technology).

                        a. Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.

b. Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts.

                        c. Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems.

                        d. Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving.

Students will reason and evaluate mathematical arguments.

                        a. Recognize reasoning and proof as fundamental aspects of mathematics.

                        b. Make and investigate mathematical conjectures.

                        c. Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments and proofs.

                        d. Select and use various types of reasoning and methods of proof.

 Students will communicate mathematically.

                        a. Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication.

                        b. Communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers,

                        teachers, and others.

                        c. Analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others.

                        d. Use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.

 Students will make connections among mathematical ideas and to other disciplines.

                        a. Recognize and use connections among mathematical ideas.

                        b. Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to

                        produce a coherent whole.

                        c. Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.

 Students will represent mathematics in multiple ways.

                        a. Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate

                        mathematical ideas.

                        b. Select, apply, and translate among mathematical representations to solve

                        problems.

                        c. Use representations to model and interpret physical, social, and mathematical

                        phenomena.

 

 

Grade 3 - Science

Habits of Mind

                        S3CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

           a. Keep records of investigations and observations and do not alter the records later.

           b. Offer reasons for findings and consider reasons suggested by others.

           c. Take responsibility for understanding the importance of being safety conscious.

                         S3CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

           Georgia Department of Education Kathy Cox, State Superintendent of Schools 8/29/2006 2:48 PM Page 3 of 6 a. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers mentally, on paper, and with a calculator.

 

           b. Use commonly encountered fractions – halves, thirds, and fourths (but not sixths, sevenths, and so on) – in scientific calculations.

           c. Judge whether measurements and computations of quantities, such as length, weight, or time, are reasonable answers to scientific problems by comparing them to typical values.

                         S3CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities utilizing safe laboratory procedures.

           a. Choose appropriate common materials for making simple mechanical constructions and repairing things.

           b. Use computers, cameras and recording devices for capturing information.

           c. Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

                        S3CS4. Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

           a. Observe and describe how parts influence one another in things with many parts.

           b. Use geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and stories to represent corresponding features of objects, events, and processes in the real world.

           c. Identify ways in which the representations do not match their original counterparts.

                         S3CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

           a. Write instructions that others can follow in carrying out a scientific procedure.

           b. Make sketches to aid in explaining scientific procedures or ideas.

           c. Use numerical data in describing and comparing objects and events.

           d. Locate scientific information in reference books, back issues of newspapers and magazines, CD-ROMs, and computer databases.

                         S3CS6. Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.

           a. Support statements with facts found in books, articles, and databases, and identify the sources used.

The Nature of Science

                        S3CS7. Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

 Students will recognize that:

           a. Similar scientific investigations seldom produce exactly the same results, which may differ due to unexpected differences in whatever is being investigated, unrecognized differences in the methods or circumstances of the investigation, or observational uncertainties.

           b. Some scientific knowledge is very old and yet is still applicable today.

                        S3CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

                         

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

           a. Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.

           b. Clear and active communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.

           c. Scientists use technology to increase their power to observe things and to measure and compare things accurately.

           d. Science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

 

Grade 4 - Science

Habits of the Mind

                        S4CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

           a. Keep records of investigations and observations and do not alter the records later.

           b. Carefully distinguish observations from ideas and speculation about those observations.

           c. Offer reasons for findings and consider reasons suggested by others.

           d. Take responsibility for understanding the importance of being safety conscious.

                         S4CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

           a. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers mentally, on paper, and with a calculator.

           b. Use fractions and decimals, and translate between decimals and commonly encountered fractions – halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, tenths, and hundredths (but not sixths, sevenths, and so on) – in scientific calculations.

           c. Judge whether measurements and computations of quantities, such as length, area, volume, weight, or time, are reasonable answers to scientific problems by comparing them to typical values.

                         S4CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities utilizing safe laboratory procedures.

           a. Choose appropriate common materials for making simple mechanical constructions and repairing things.

           b. Measure and mix dry and liquid materials in prescribed amounts, exercising reasonable safety.

           c. Use computers, cameras and recording devices for capturing information.

           d. Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

                         S4CS4. Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

           a. Observe and describe how parts influence one another in things with many parts.

           b. Use geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and stories to represent corresponding features of objects, events, and processes in the real world. Identify ways in which the representations do not match their original counterparts.

           c. Identify patterns of change in things—such as steady, repetitive, or irregular change—using records, tables, or graphs of measurements where appropriate.

                         S4CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

           a. Write instructions that others can follow in carrying out a scientific procedure.

           b. Make sketches to aid in explaining scientific procedures or ideas.

           c. Use numerical data in describing and comparing objects and events.

           d. Locate scientific information in reference books, back issues of newspapers and magazines, CD-ROMs, and computer databases.

                         S4CS6. Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.

           a. Support statements with facts found in books, articles, and databases, and identify the sources used.

           b. Identify when comparisons might not be fair because some conditions are different.

 The Nature of Science

                        S4CS7. Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

 Students will recognize that:

           a. Similar scientific investigations seldom produce exactly the same results, which may differ due to unexpected differences in whatever is being investigated, unrecognized differences in the methods or circumstances of the investigation, or observational uncertainties.

           b. Some scientific knowledge is very old and yet is still applicable today.

                         S4CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

 Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

           a. Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.

           b. Clear and active communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.

           c. Scientists use technology to increase their power to observe things and to measure and compare things accurately.

           d. Science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

 Earth Science

                        S4E1. Students will compare and contrast the physical attributes of stars, star patterns, and planets.

           a. Recognize the physical attributes of stars in the night sky such as number, size, color and patterns.

           b. Compare the similarities and differences of planets to the stars in appearance, position, and number in the night sky.

           c. Explain why the pattern of stars in a constellation stays the same, but a planet can be seen in different locations at different times.

           d. Identify how technology is used to observe distant objects in the sky.

 

                        S4E2. Students will model the position and motion of the earth in the solar system and will explain the role of relative position and motion in determining sequence of the phases of the moon.

           a. Explain the day/night cycle of the earth using a model.

           b. Explain the sequence of the phases of the moon.

           c. Demonstrate the revolution of the earth around the sun and the earth’s tilt to explain the seasonal changes.

           d. Demonstrate the relative size and order from the sun of the planets in the solar system.

 

Grade 5 - Science

Habits of the Mind

S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

           a. Keep records of investigations and observations and do not alter the records later.

           b. Carefully distinguish observations from ideas and speculation about those observations.

           c. Offer reasons for findings and consider reasons suggested by others.

           d. Take responsibility for understanding the importance of being safety conscious.

 

S5CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

           a. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers mentally, on paper, and with a calculator.

           b. Use fractions and decimals, and translate between decimals and commonly encountered fractions – halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, tenths, and hundredths (but not sixths, sevenths, and so on) – in scientific calculations.

           c. Judge whether measurements and computations of quantities, such as length, area, volume, weight, or time, are reasonable answers to scientific problems by comparing them to typical values.

 

S5CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

           a. Choose appropriate common materials for making simple mechanical constructions and repairing things.

           b. Measure and mix dry and liquid materials in prescribed amounts, exercising reasonable safety.

           c. Use computers, cameras and recording devices for capturing information.

           d. Identify and practice accepted safety procedures in manipulating science materials and equipment.

 

S5CS4. Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

           a. Observe and describe how parts influence one another in things with many parts.

           b. Use geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and stories to represent corresponding features of objects, events, and processes in the real world. Identify ways in which the representations do not match their original counterparts.

           c. Identify patterns of change in things—such as steady, repetitive, or irregular change—using records, tables, or graphs of measurements where appropriate.

           d. Identify the biggest and the smallest possible values of something.

 

S5CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

           a. Write instructions that others can follow in carrying out a scientific procedure.

           b. Make sketches to aid in explaining scientific procedures or ideas.

           c. Use numerical data in describing and comparing objects and events.

           d. Locate scientific information in reference books, back issues of newspapers and magazines, CD-ROMs, and computer databases.

 

S5CS6. Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.

           a. Support statements with facts found in books, articles, and databases, and identify the sources used.

           b. Identify when comparisons might not be fair because some conditions are different.

 

The Nature of Science

S5CS7. Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

Students will recognize that:

           a. Similar scientific investigations seldom produce exactly the same results, which may differ due to unexpected differences in whatever is being investigated, unrecognized differences in the methods or circumstances of the investigation, or observational uncertainties.

           b. Some scientific knowledge is very old and yet is still applicable today.

 

S5CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

           a. Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.

           b. Clear and active communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.

           c. Scientists use technology to increase their power to observe things and to measure and compare things accurately.

           d. Science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

 

 

 


 

SPACE EXPLORATION GIFTED UNIT

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

the milky way

Why has space exploration been so important to the success of the human race? In what patterns do the stars and planets align in the night sky?

What ‘tools’ have been used to further space exploration?

Why is the Sun so essential to life in this solar system?

 

How do the Stars Create the Constellations and Galaxies in the Solar System?

 

Where does our Planet Fit into the Solar System?

 

 


 

TIMELINE OF SPACE EXPLORATION
The Milky Way

 

Time Line of Space Exploration


October 4, 1957 - Sputnik 1, the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, is launched by the U.S.S.R., and remains in orbit until January 4, 1958.
November 3, 1957 - Sputnik 2, carrying the dog Laika for 7 days in orbit, is launched by the U.S.S.R., and remains in orbit until April 13, 1958.


January 31, 1958 - Explorer 1, the first U.S. satellite in orbit, lifts off at Cape Canaveral using a modified ABMA-JPL Jupiter-C rocket. It carries a scientific experiment of James A. Van Allen, and discovers the Earth's radiation belt.
March 5, 1958 - Explorer 2 is launched by a Jupiter-C rocket, and fails to reach orbit.
March 17, 1958 - Vanguard 1 satellite is launched into orbit, and continues to transmit for 3 years.
May 15, 1958 - Sputnik 3 is launched by the U.S.S.R.
October 1, 1958 - N.A.S.A. is founded, taking over existing National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics.
October 11, 1958 - Pioneer 1, U.S. - IGY space probe, launched to a height of 70,700 miles.


January 2, 1959 - Luna 1, first man-made satellite to orbit the moon, is launched by the U.S.S.R.
March 3, 1959 - Pioneer 4, fourth U.S.-IGY space probe was launched by a Juno II rocket, and achieved an earth-moon trajectory, passing within 37,000 miles of the moon. It then fell into a solar orbit, becoming the first U.S. sun orbiter.
September 12, 1959 - Luna 2 is launched, impacting on the moon on September 13 carrying a copy of the Soviet coat of arms, and becoming the first man-made object to hit the moon.
October 4, 1959 - Luna 3 translunar satellite is launched, orbiting the moon and photographing 70 percent of the far side of the moon.


April 1, 1960 - Tiros 1, the first successful weather satellite, is launched by the U.S.
August 18, 1960 - Discoverer XIV launches the first U.S. camera-equipped Corona spy satellite.


April 12, 1961 - Vostok 1 is launched by the U.S.S.R., carrying Cosmonaut Yuri A. Gargarin, the first man in space. He orbits the Earth once.
May 5, 1961 - Mercury Freedom 7 carries Alan B. Shepard,Jr., the first U.S. Astronaut into space, in a suborbital flight.
August 6, 1961 - Vostok 2 is launched by the U.S.S.R., carrying Cosmonaut Gherman Titov, the first day-long Soviet space flight.


February 20, 1962 - Mercury Friendship 7 lifts off with John H. Glenn, Jr., the first American in orbit, and orbits the Earth three times.
May 24, 1962 - Mercury Aurora 7 is launched with M. Scott Carpenter, making three orbits.
July 10, 1962 - Telstar 1, U.S. satellite, beams the first live transatlantic telecast.
December 14, 1962 - U.S. Mariner 2, the first successful planetary spacecraft, flies past Venus, and enters a solar orbit.


June 16, 1963 - Vostok 6 carries Soviet Cosmonaut Valentia Tereshkova, the first woman in space and orbits the Earth 48 times.
June, 1963 - Martin Schmidt interprets the behavior of 3C 273 - the first known quasar.


July 31, 1964 - U.S. Ranger 7 relays the first close-range photographs of the Moon.


March 18, 1965 - The first space walk is made from Soviet Voskhod 2 by Cosmonaut Alexei A. Leonov. Duration is 12 minutes.
March 23, 1965 - First manned flight of the Gemini program, Gemini 3 carrying Virgil I. Grissom and John W. Young. Made three orbits around the earth.
March 24, 1965 - Ranger 9 transmits high-quality images of the moon, many of which were shown live in the first television spectacular about the moon.
June 3, 1965 - Edward White II makes the first U.S. space walk from Gemini 4. Duration is 22 minutes.
July 14, 1965 - U.S. Mariner 4 returns the first close-range images about Mars.
November 16, 1965 - Soviet Venus 3 is launched, becoming the first craft to impact Venus on March 1, 1966.
December 4, 1965 - Gemini 7 is launched carrying Frank Borman and James A. Lovell, Jr., making 206 orbits around Earth and proving a trip to the Moon possible.
December 15, 1965 - American astronauts Walter Schirra, Jr. and Thomas Stafford in Gemini 6 make the first space rendezvous with Gemini 7.


February 3, 1966 - Soviet Luna 9 is the first spacecraft to soft-land on the moon.
March 1, 1966 - Soviet Venera 3 impacts on Venus, the first spacecraft to reach another planet. It fails to return data.
March, 1966 - Soviet Luna 10 is the first spacecraft to orbit the moon.
June 2, 1966 - Surveyor 1 is the first U.S. spacecraft to soft-land on the Moon.
August 14, 1966 - U.S. Lunar Orbiter 1 enters moon orbit, and takes the first picture of the Earth from the distance of the moon.


April 23, 1967 - Soviet Soyuz 1 is launched, carrying Vladimir M. Komarov. On April 24 it crashed, killing Komarov, the first spaceflight fatality.
October 18, 1967 - Venera 4 sends a descent capsule into the Venusian atmosphere, returning data about its composition.


September 15, 1968 - Soviet Zond 5 is launched, the first spacecraft to orbit the Moon and return.
October 11, 1968 - Apollo 7 is the first manned Apollo mission with Walter M. Schirra, Jr., Donn F. Eisele, and Walter Cunningham. It orbited the earth once.
December 21, 1968 - Apollo 8 is launched with Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr. and William A. Anders, the first Apollo to use the Saturn V rocket, and the first manned spacecraft to orbit the Moon, making 10 orbits on its 6-day mission.


January, 1969 - Soyuz 4 & 5 perform the first Soviet spaceship docking, transferring Cosmonauts between vehicles.
July 20, 1969 - Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, Jr. make the first manned soft landing on the Moon, and the first moonwalk, using Apollo 11.
July 31, 1969 - Mariner 6 returns high-resolution images of the Martian surface, concentrating on the equatorial region.
August 5, 1969 - Mariner 7 returns high-resolution images of the Martian surface, concentrating on the southern hemisphere.


April 11, 1970 - Apollo 13 is launched, suffering an explosion in its SM oxygen tanks. Its Moon landing is aborted, and the crew, James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr. and Fred W. Haise, Jr., return safely.
September 12, 1970 - Soviet Luna 16 is launched, conducting the first successful return of lunar soil samples by an automatic spacecraft.
November 17, 1970 - Luna 17 lands on the moon, with the first automatic robot, Lunokhod 1. Driven by a five-man team on earth, traveled over surface for 11 days.
December 15, 1970 - Soviet Venera 7 is the first probe to soft-land on Venus, transmitting for 23 minutes.


January 31, 1971 - Apollo 14 moon mission is launched by the U.S. with the legendary Alan Shepard, along with Stuart Roosa and Edgar Mitchell on board. They land in the planned Apollo 13 site, the Fra Mauro highlands, which they explore with the help of a two-wheeled cart that permits the transport of a significantly greater quantity of lunar material than previous missions. Shepard becomes the first man to hit a golf ball on the moon.
April 19, 1971 - Salyut 1 space station is launched by the U.S.S.R. It remains in orbit until May 28, 1973.
May 30, 1971 - The United States launches Mariner 9, which becomes the first spacecraft to survey Mars from orbit.
June 6, 1971 - Soyuz 11 carried Cosmonauts G.T. Dobrovolsky, V.N. Volkov, and V.I. Patsayev to Salyut 1, the first manned occupancy of an orbital station. However, on June 29, the Cosmonauts died upon Soyuz 11's reentry.
July 30, 1971 - Apollo 15 astronauts David Scott and James Irwin drive the first moon rover. The next year, Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt drives a similar rover.
November 13, 1971 - American Mariner 9 (launched May 30, 1971) is the first spacecraft to orbit another planet, Mars. Over the next year, it maps 100 percent of the Martian surface.


March 2, 1972 - Pioneer 10 is launched on an Atlas/Centaur/TE364-4 towards Jupiter by the U.S., designed to familiarize alien life with humans. It returns the first close-up images of Jupiter in 1973.
July 15, 1972 - Pioneer 10 becomes the first man-made object to travel through the asteroid belt.
December, 1972 - Scientists designate Cignus X-1 as the first probable black hole.


April 5, 1973 - Pioneer 11 is launched on an Atlas/Centaur/TE364-4, flying past Jupiter in 1974, and Saturn in 1979, where it discovers new rings.
May 14, 1973 - Skylab Workshop is launched by the U.S., and maintained by three crews.
May 25, 1973 - First crew to Skylab, Skylab 2, are launched, repairing damage incurred to Skylab during its launch.
November 3, 1973 - American Mariner 10 is launched, on the first dual-planet mission. Over the next year, it returned photographs of Venus and Mercury.


May 17, 1974 - NASA launches the first Synchronous Meteorological Satellite, SMS-1.
June 24, 1974 - Soviet Salyut 3, their first military space station, is launched. It remains in orbit until January 1975.
December 26, 1974 - Soviet Salyut 4, civilian space station, is launched. It remains in orbit until February 2, 1977.


July, 1975 - American Apollo (18) and Soviet Soyuz 19 dock, the first international spacecraft rendezvous.
October, 1975 - Soviet Venera 9 and 10 send the first pictures of the Venusian surface to Earth.


June 22, 1976 - Soviet military space station Salyut 5 is launched, remaining in orbit until August 8, 1977.
July 20, 1976 - Pictures of the Martian surface are taken by Viking 1, the first U.S. attempt to soft land a spacecraft on another planet.
September 3, 1976 - Viking 2 lands on Mars on the Plain of Utopia, where it discovered water frost.


August-September, 1977 - Voyagers 1 and 2 leave Earth to meet with Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980.
September 29, 1977 - Soviet Salyut 6 space station is launched. Its crews include members from Czechoslovakia, Poland, GDR, Bulgaria, Hungary, Vietnam, Cuba, Mongolia, and Romania.


November, 1978 - The Einstein Observatory begins its 30-day mission.
December, 1978 - Two Pioneer spacecraft reach Venus. One drops four probes into the atmosphere, while the other maps the surface.


September 1, 1979 - Pioneer 11 reaches Saturn, flying to within 13,000 miles and taking the first close-up photographs.


April 12, 1981 - The first manned mission of the Space Transportation System (STS-1), Columbia , is launched.
June 19, 1981 - The European Space Agency launches its third Ariane rocket.
December 20, 1981 - The ESA launches a fourth Ariane rocket.


March 1, 1982 - Venera 13 lands on Venus, and provides the first Venusian soil analysis.
April 19, 1982 - Soviet Salyut 7 space station is launched.
May 13, 1982 - Soviet Cosmonauts Anatoly N. Berezovoi and Valentin V. Lebedev are launched in Soyuz-T 5 to rendezvous with Salyut 7, the first team to inhabit the space station. They return to Earth in Soyuz-T 7, setting a (then) duration record of 211 days.
August, 1982 - Voyager 2 completes its flyby of Saturn.
November 11, 1982 - The space shuttle Columbia's fifth mission, its first operational one, begins, deploying two satellites. Crew: Vance Brand, Robert Overmyer, Joseph Allen, and William Lenoir.


April 4, 1983 - The space shuttle Challenger lifts off for its first mission (STS-6) and has the first American space walk in nine years. Crew: Paul Weitz, Karol Bobko, Donald Peterson, and Story Musgrave.
June 19, 1983 - Sally K. Ride is the first U.S. woman to travel in space, on Challenger mission STS-7.
October 10, 1983 - Soviet Venera 15 returns the first high-resolution images of the Venus polar area, and compiled a thermal map of most of the northern hemisphere.
November 28, 1983 - The space shuttle Columbia carries the ESA Spacelab-1 into orbit (STS-9). Its crew includes Ulf Merbold, A German and first ESA member in space..
January-November, 1983 - The Infrared Astronomical Satellite finds new comets, asteroids, galaxies, and a dust ring around the star Vega that may be new planets.


February 3, 1984 - Bruce McCandless takes the first untethered space walk using MMU from the space shuttle Challenger (STS-41B).
July 17, 1984 - launch of Soyuz-T 12 carrying Svetlana Savitskaya, who becomes the first woman to walk in space.
August 30, 1984 - The third space shuttle, Discovery, lifts off on it's maiden voyage (STS-41D). Crew: Henry W. Hartsfield, Michael L. Coats, Richard Mullane, Steven Hawley, Judith A. Resnik, and Charles D. Walker.
October, 1984 - Salyut 7's cosmonauts L. D. Kizim, V. A. Solovyov, and O. Y. Atkov set a (then) 237-day record in space. They arrive at Salyut 7 in Soyuz-T 10 and depart in Soyuz-T 11
October 5, 1984 - launch of space shuttle Challenger mission STS-41G carrying the first crew with two women aboard - Sally Ride and Katherine Sullivan. Sullivan becomes the first American woman to walk in space.
December, 1984 - Soviet/International Vega 1 & 2 are launched, dropping probes into Venus' atmosphere before continuing to Halley's Comet.


January 8, 1985 - The Sakigake probe is launched by Japan's Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, becoming the first interplanetary probe as it rendezvous with Halley's Comet.
April 29, 1985 - The Challenger carries the ESA Spacelab-3 into orbit (STS-51B).
July 2, 1985 - The European Space Agency launches the Giotto spacecraft from an Ariane rocket. It encounters Halley's Comet in 1986, and Comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup in 1992.
October 3, 1985 - The fourth space shuttle Atlantis takes off on its first mission (STS-51J). Crew: Karol J. Bobko, Ronald J. Grabe, Robert A. Stewart, David C. Hilmers, and William A. Pailes.
October 1985 - Spacelab D1, the first joint German/ESA mission, is flown. Its crew consists of two German DARA astronauts, and Danish Wubbo Ockels of the ESA.


January, 1986 - Voyager 2 flies past Uranus.
January 28, 1986 - The space shuttle Challenger explodes shortly after liftoff of mission STS-51L.
February 20, 1986 - The core unit of Soviet space station Mir is launched.
March, 1986 - Spacecraft from the U.S.S.R, Japan, and Western Europe fly by Halley's Comet on it's 30th recorded appearance.
March, 1986 - Astronomers discover an invisible gravity source that splits a quasar's light.
April, 1986 - Astronomers find that our galaxy is smaller than they thought and the Sun is 23,000 light-years from it's center.


February 25, 1987 - Supernova 1987A blazes into view.
December 1987 - Cosmonaut Yuri V. Romanenko returns from space station Mir, having arrived there from Soyuz-TM 2, and sets a (then) space endurance record of 326 days.


May 4, 1989 - Space Shuttle Atlantis is launched (STS-30), deploying the spacecraft Magellan.
July 12, 1989 - Soviet/International Phobos 2 launched, which orbits Mars to study its surface, atmosphere and magnetic field.
October 18, 1989 - U.S. launches the Galileo spacecraft from Shuttle Atlantis flight STS-34, which took infrared images of Venus, and images of the asteroid Ida, before continuing to Jupiter.


April 5, 1990 - U.S. Pegasus rocket is deployed from a B-52 bomber, and launched the Pegsat satellite in the first demonstration of the Pegasus launch vehicle.
April 24, 1990 - Space Shuttle Discovery launches on STS-31, deploying the Edwin P. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) astronomical observatory.
August, 1990 - U.S. spacecraft Magellan arrives at Venus, where for the next year it took radar images of the surface.
October 6, 1990 - Space Shuttle Discovery launches the Ulysses spacecraft with two upper stages, on mission STS-41. Ulysses flies toward Jupiter, to be slingshot towards the sun, to obtain data from high solar latitudes.


February 7, 1991 - Salyut 7 falls from orbit and burns up over Argentina.
April 5, 1991 - Space Shuttle Atlantis carries the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory into orbit. This new space telescope, built by NASA, was the first to provide an all-sky continuous survey in the gamma-ray and X-ray spectra.
June 5, 1991 - Shuttle Columbia carries the Spacelab SLS-1 into orbit, to conduct investigations into the effects of weightlessness on humans. (STS-40)


February 8, 1992 - Spacecraft Ulysses flies around Jupiter, on its way to the sun.
May 2, 1992 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off on its first mission (STS-49), repairing the Intelsat VI satellite. Crew: Daniel C. Brandenstein, Kevin P. Chilton, Richard J. Hieb, Bruce E. Melnick, Pierre J. Thout, Kathryn C. Thornton, and Thomas D. Akers.
September 25, 1992 - Mars Observer lifts off, the first American probe to Mars in 17 years, since Viking 2. This probe is intended as an orbital mapper to study the red planet's atmosphere, surface, and geological make-up. The spacecraft functions well during its cruise to Mars, then all contact was lost on August 21, 1993, three days before orbital insertion.


December 2, 1993 - Space Shuttle Endeavour launches on STS-61, making the first on-orbit service of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST).


January 25, 1994 - U.S. launches Clementine, a new DOD satellite that performs a lunar mapping mission using advanced ballistic missile defense technologies. It suffers a malfunction on May 10, 1994, ending its mission.
February, 1994 - A Russian Cosmonaut, Sergei Krikalev, flies on board the U.S. space shuttle Discovery for the first time (STS-60).
September 13, 1994 - Spacecraft Ulysses reaches a maximum Southern latitude of 80.2 degrees at the sun, proceeding towards the Northern latitudes, maintaining an orbital period of six years.
October 12, 1994 - Spacecraft Magellan enters the atmosphere of Venus, burning up following the completion of its mapping mission.
December 9, 1994 - Asteroid XM1 passes within 65,000 miles of Earth.


February 6, 1995 - Space shuttle Discovery maneuvers to within 37 feet of Russian space station Mir, in preparation for a shuttle-Mir docking (STS-63). This is the first shuttle mission to be flown by a female pilot.
March 22, 1995 - Cosmonaut Valeriy Polyakov returns to Earth after a 438-day mission aboard Russian space station Mir, setting a new space endurance record.
June 26, 1995 - Space Shuttle Atlantis rendezvous with Russian space station Mir during a ten-day mission on STS-71. Cosmonauts are transferred to and from Atlantis, and Astronaut Norman Thagard is returned from Mir, having arrived on Soyuz-TM 21, and making a new American space endurance record of 115 days.
September 1995 - Pioneer 11 ceases making scientific observations, its power source nearly depleted.
November 12, 1995 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off on mission STS-74, making the second docking with Russian space station Mir. It delivers two solar arrays, and a docking module for future Shuttle dockings.
December 7, 1995 - The Galileo spacecraft arrives at Jupiter, performing an orbit while dropping a probe into the atmosphere, and putting a satellite into orbit, which will spend the next two years orbiting the planet.


February 8, 1996 - Thomas Reiter becomes the first European Space Agency astronaut to make two spacewalks (both from the Russian Mir space station). His previous spacewalk was on October 21, 1995, and lasted 5 hours 11 minutes.
February 17, 1996 - NASA launches the first in the Discovery series of spacecraft, the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft, aboard a Delta II-7925-8 rocket.
March 22, 1996 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off on STS-76, performing the third docking with Space Station Mir. Astronaut Shannon Lucid was left on Mir, becoming the first female Astronaut to crew a Space Station.
September 26, 1996 - Space Shuttle Atlantis touches down after mission STS-79. It brings back Shannon Lucid, who becomes the longest US astronaut in space, and the longest female astronaut in space.
November 19, 1996 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off on its 21st space flight, setting a new shuttle in-space endurance record of almost 18 days. This flight carries Story Musgrave, at that time the oldest man to fly in space at 61 years of age.


January 12, 1997 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off for the fifth docking with the Mir space station, and Jerry Linenger replaces John Blaha as the American crew member.
February 10, 1997 - Soyuz TM25 lifts off to dock with the Mir space station. New Russian crew members Vasily Tsibliyev and Alexander Lazutkin relieve Russians Korzun and Kaleri for the beginning of an eventful and difficult tour of duty. Before the resident crew leaves, a fierce fire breaks out on board which is contained and put out before serious damage is done. After the old crew leaves, an attempt to re-dock with the Progress supply freighter fails, with the freighter just missing collision with Mir. These events are followed by failures of the electrolysis oxygen generators and the station's attitude control system.
February 11, 1997 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off on the second maintenance mission for the Hubble Space Telescope, installing a new spectrograph, infrared camera, new guidance sensors, a new computer and data recorder, and repairing the telescope's insulation.
March 31, 1997 - After 25 years of operation, routine telemetry and ground control with Pioneer 10 is terminated. The probe at that moment is 6.7 billion miles from Earth, traveling at 28,000 miles per hour. In two million years, it will reach the red giant Aldeberan in the constellation of Taurus.
April 4, 1997 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off for the shortest shuttle flight in 12 years (four days). The flight is cut short due to a failure of one of the spacecraft's three fuel cells.
May 17, 1997 - Space Shuttle Atlantis performs its sixth docking with Mir. Jerry Linenger is relieved by Michael Foale as the American crewmember on Mir. Atlantis returned to Earth on May 24th and Mir continued with its troubles. On June 24th, the crew attempts a test with a new docking system to dock with a Progress freighter. The failure of the new system results in the collision of the freighter into Mir, causing a serious air leak and damage to the electrical power of the station.
June 27, 1997 - NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) probe passes the asteroid Mathilde on its way to meeting up with 433 Eros.
July 1, 1997 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off again to complete the flight aborted in April. The shuttle is outfitted with Spacelab, set up as a microgravity science laboratory, with 33 different experiments, that fills the cargo bay.
July 4, 1997 - Mars Pathfinder becomes the first probe to successfully land on Mars since Viking 2 in 1976. It is also the first planetary probe to include a separate roving robot probe (Sojourner) since the Soviet Union's Luna 21 in 1973.
August 7, 1997 - Soyuz TM26 arrives at Mir with a relief crew. The fresh Russian crew, along with Michael Foale, undertake seven internal and external spacewalk missions over a six month period in order to repair the crippled station. During the repairs, the station has a near collision with an abandoned satellite (MSTI 2), which speeds past to within 500 meters of Mir.
August 7, 1997 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for a 12-day mission to deploy and retrieve the Crista-Spas 2 satellite, which studied the Earth's middle atmosphere. This flight also tested various infra-red and ultraviolet instrumentation, and tested the Japanese robot-arm to be used for the International Space Station.
September 12, 1997 - Mars Global Surveyor arrives at Mars and begins the process of adjusting its highly elliptical orbit into a circular one using aerobraking - friction with the top of the Martian atmosphere to slow the craft down. Taking about 2,000 images of the planet, this probe shows the entire life of a dust storm, evidence of Martian streams, ponds, oceans, and underground water drainage systems.
September 27, 1997 - Space Shuttle Atlantis performs its seventh docking with Mir to support the repair & upgrade process, and bringing additional experiments for the space station.
October 15, 1997 - launch of the double probe Cassini/Huygens, aimed at Saturn. This is probably the most ambitious and complex unmanned planetary project ever attempted, costing more than $2.5 billion and involving 17 nations and hundreds of scientists from the U.S. and Europe. It carries a sophisticated camera package and 11 other instruments aimed at performing 19 experiments on the ringed planet. It will arrive at Saturn in 2004, will orbit Saturn up to 60 times sending back close-up photographs of Saturn's rings and its 18 moons. Cassini also carries a separate probe, Huygens. This probe will be dropped through the atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan.
November 19, 1997 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off with three American astronauts, one Japanese, and the first Ukrainian astronaut, Leonid Kadenyuk. This mission, mostly dedicated to science and the testing of new space technologies, releases one free-flying satellite.


January 7, 1998 - Lunar Prospector is the first NASA mission to the Moon in 25 years, and the first dedicated to lunar research since Apollo 17 in 1972. The spacecraft is placed in lunar orbit to make a careful spectroscopic analysis of the entire lunar surface, including its North and South poles, and soon confirms what the Department of Defense Clementine mission had found in 1994 - that trapped within some of the craters at the Moon's two poles is about 6.6 trillion tons of permanently frozen water ice.
January 22, 1998 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off to rendezvous with Mir, the eight U.S. docking with the Russian space station and the first by a shuttle other than Atlantis.
February 14, 1998 - The four satellites Globalstar 1, 2, 3, and 4 are the first in Globalstar's planned 44-satellite constellation of medium-Earth-orbit (~900 miles altitude) communications satellites for providing voice and data links worldwide from both remote and home telephones. This system is planned as a direct competitor to Iridium's cluster, which began launching in May of 1997.
April 17, 1998 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off on a 16-day mission, its 25th. The mission is dedicated to the study of the effects of weightlessness on the human neurological system, with the astronauts serving as both researchers and experimental subjects.
June 2, 1998 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off on a 10-day mission, its 24th and the last shuttle docking with Mir.
July 3, 1998 - Japan launches the Nozomi probe to Mars, the first planetary mission by a country other than the U.S. or the Soviet Union/Russia. Using a combination of lunar gravity, Earth gravity, and rocket burns, Nozomi is scheduled to arrive at Mars in December 2003.
October 3, 1998 - Launched by the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office, the Space Technology EXperiment (STEX) satellite tests 29 new spacecraft designs, including an almost four-mile-long tether, advanced solar panels, and an ion engine test.
October 24, 1998 - NASA launches Deep Space 1, a technology test spacecraft which evaluates a dozen advanced spacecraft engineering designs, from mirror-enhanced solar panels to the first use of an ion engine to leave Earth orbit and rendezvous with the asteroid Braille.
October 29, 1998 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off with John Glenn aboard, first American to orbit Earth and at 77, the oldest man to fly in space. The flight is the last purely scientific shuttle flight, focusing on astronomy, life sciences, and materials. One satellite is deployed, one is released and retrieved. Most subsequent shuttle flights are ferry and construction flights for the International Space Station.
November 20, 1998 - the first component of the International Space Station, Zarya, is launched on a Russian rocket. This Russian built, U.S. financed module provides communications, electrical power, and attitude control for the station until the arrival of the third module (Zvezda, in July 2000).
December 4, 1998 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off on its thirteenth space flight, with the International Space Station's second module, Unity. This module provides the docking ports and connections for every other docked module.
December 11, 1998 - Mars Climate Orbiter is launched by NASA, with the objective of studying Martian weather. The probe is lost as it approaches Mars on September 23, 1999, due to an error in propulsion software, using English instead of metric units. The probe passes too close to Mars and burns up in the atmosphere.
December 23, 1998 - NEAR space probe flies to within 2400 miles of the asteroid 433 Eros, taking 222 photographs of nearly two-thirds of its surface. A software problem prevents the spacecraft from going into orbit around the asteroid, but a second engine burn on January 3, 1999 brings the spacecraft back to Eros in February of 2000.


January 3, 1999 - Mars Polar Lander lifts off on its ill-fated mission to Mars. This NASA probe is to land within about 600 miles of the Martian South Pole, along with dropping two surface-penetrating darts. Contact with the probe is lost on December 3, 1999 as it is descending through the Martian atmosphere and it is never heard from again, the first failure of a U.S. planetary soft landing in 30 years.
February 7, 1999 - The NASA satellite Stardust lifts off for a rendezvous with the Comet Wild-2 in January of 2004.
February 20, 1999 - the Russian Soyuz TM29 lifts off for the Mir space station. This is scheduled to be the final mission to Mir, and when the crew of TM29 departs Mir in August of 1999, they leave the space station empty for the first time in almost exactly 10 years.
May 27, 1999 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for the International Space Station. They bring supplies and perform a spacewalk of nearly eight hours to install two exterior cranes, along with a variety of tools and equipment for future astronaut use. They deploy the satellite Starshine for studying atmospheric density changes.
July 23, 1999 - Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off, carrying the Chandra X-Ray Observatory into orbit.
July 28, 1999 - Deep Space 1 flies to within 16 miles of the asteroid Braille and continues on its course to rendezvous with Comet Wilson-Harrington in January 2001.
November 19, 1999 - China launches Shenzhou, the first unmanned test of their manned capsule.
December 19, 1999 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for the third maintenance mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. They perform three space walks, installing six new gyroscopes, a new guidance sensor, a new computer, a voltage/temperature kit for the spacecraft's batteries, a new transmitter, a new solid state recorder, and thermal insulation blankets.


January 3, 2000 - the Galileo space probe safely completes its encounter with Jupiter's ice moon, Europa, at an altitude of 343 km. Later in the year, on May 30, Galileo flies by Jupiter's largest moon Ganymede at an altitude of 808 km.
February 11, 2000 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off to carry out the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, cosponsored by NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency. A large radar antenna in the payload bay and a smaller element deployed on a 60-meter boom work together in the synthetic-aperture mode to produce the effect of a much larger antenna. The mission produces a three-dimensional map of about 80% of the world's landmass.
February 14, 2000 - NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) probe settles into orbit around the asteroid 433 Eros, producing a series of stunning close-up images. Ground controllers start tightening its orbit for an eventual soft impact with the tumbling, potato-shaped asteroid.
April 4, 2000 - Soyuz TM30 lifts off on a return mission to Mir, reversing Russia's actions of the previous year to shut the space station down. The idea is to re-open the space station for commercial operations, including a Mir version of the Survivor TV show. The cosmonauts remain until mid-June, and two Progress freighters are flown up (one in April, one in October) before financial support disappears and the venture falls through.
May 19, 2000 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off for the International Space Station for maintenance on the crane and a faulty antenna, installation of a Russian boom arm, handrails and upgrades to the ventilation system, and delivery of new batteries, supplies and equipment.
July 12, 2000 - the Zvezda service module for the International Space Station (ISS) is launched from Russia on a Proton rocket. The automated docking of this unit with the first linked pair of modules already in orbit - Zarya and Unity - allows the U.S. to start a series of space shuttle launches to add American-built components, which will be followed by laboratory modules from Europe and Japan. Zvezda will act as the control center and living quarters for the initial space station crews.
September 8, 2000 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off on a 12-day mission to outfit the ISS, completing the installation of the Zvezda module.
October 11, 2000 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off on a 14-day mission to install the Z1 segment, the first piece of the space station truss, and a third docking port (PMA-3) for the Unity adapter. They also test the new 'SAFER' spacesuit backpack propulsion units.
October 31, 2000 - the Expedition One crew is launched on a Soyuz transport to become the first crew of the ISS.
December 1, 2000 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off on a 12 day mission to the ISS. They install the first set of ISS's solar panels and radiators for removing heat.


January 9, 2001 - the first launch of the "true" millenium is Chinese, with the second test flight of the manned Shenshou spaceship, reported to be carrying a monkey, a dog, and a rabbit.
February 7, 2001 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off for the ISS, carrying the U.S.'s Destiny laboratory module. In three space walks the astronauts install Destiny, a grappler for the station's robotic arm, and radio antennae.
February 14, 2001 - NEAR soft impacts on the asteroid 433 Eros, at 2 m/s. Signals continue to be received from the probe hours after the landing, confirming its survival.
March 8, 2001 - Space Shuttle Discovery is launched on a 14-day ISS construction mission. In two spacewalks the astronauts install new equipment including the Leonardo logistics module, built by the Italian Space Agency to move racks of experimental equipment to the ISS, docking to the station as the equipment is used & transferred, then carrying equipment back in the shuttle after use.
March 23, 2001 - fifteen years after its first launch, and after nearly 10 years of continuous occupation by astronauts, the Mir space station is de-orbited, breaking up in the atmosphere and impacting in the Pacific Ocean.
April 7, 2001 - the 2001 Mars Odyssey probe is launched on a trajectory for Mars orbit to be achieved in October, with a mission similar to that of the Mars Climate Orbiter launched December 1998. Mars Odyssey successfully enters Mars orbit on October 24th.
April 19, 2001 - Space Shuttle Endeavour lifts off for the ISS on a construction mission. The crew will install the mobile robotic arm on the station (Canadarm 2) and supply the Destiny laboratory module with new experiments, using the Rafaello logistics module.
April 28, 2001 - Soyuz spacecraft TM-32 lifts off for the ISS with the first space tourist, business executive Dennis Tito, who pays the Russians $20 million for the ride.
June 30, 2001 - NASA's Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is launched on a trajectory for a gravity boost past the moon to a position 1.5 million km outside Earth's orbit. From that position it is to measure cosmic background radiation from the dark extragalactic sky.
July 12, 2001 - Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off in the pre-dawn darkness for the ISS with the Joint Airlock which will enable space walks to be performed directly from the space station itself (I am there to watch the launch!).
August 10, 2001 - Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for the ISS with the Leonardo laboratory module and SimpleSat, an experimental low-cost astronomical telescope.
September 22, 2001 - Deep Space 1 successfully completes its flyby of comet 19P/Borrelly.
October 16, 2001 - Galileo completes another flyby of Jupiter's moon Io, passing only 181 km from Io's south polar region.
December 5, 2001 - Space Shuttle Endeavour is launched carrying the Raffaello logistics module back to the ISS with new supplies.


 

ASTRONOMERS TO KNOW

Space Man on the moon

The Moslem- Al Mamon, founded the first school of Astronomy in Baghdad (AD 810)

The Moslem- Al-Sufi, made the first recorded star map and star catalogue (AD 900)

The Chinese and Native Americans- Recorded the supernova in Taurus (AD 1000)

The Polish- Copernicus, published his books about the structure of the solar system in the 1540s.

The Danish- Tycho Brahe, founded the first astronomy report station in 1550.

The Italian- Galileo, made the first telescope for use in the field of astronomy (telescopes were in use before this) 1600.

The American- Percival Lowell, founded Mars Hill in Arizona to observe Mars in the 1890s.

The New Yorkian- Carl Sagan, teaches children and adults the wonders of the Cosmos (1950s to 1990s)
 

SPACE UNIT RESOURCES
FOR TEACHERS
Alignment of the Planets

People and Space Lesson Plans (K-5)

 http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/people-and-space.cfm

 Liftoff Into Space (K-5)

http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/liftoff-into-space.cfm

 NASA Quest (grades K-12)

 http://quest.nasa.gov/

 

NASA Quest allows educators, kids and space enthusiasts to share the excitement of NASA's authentic scientific and engineering pursuits like flying in the Shuttle and the International Space Station, exploring distant planets with amazing spacecraft, and building the aircraft of the future.  Visit the archives for even more!

ThinkQuest! Library Internet educational sites awards program

Award winning Internet based projects, created by students!, on subjects from Volcanoes to DNA, Literature Cafe to Music Magic, Arts & Entertainment to Science, Society and Culture, and LOTS more!

 

NASA Educational Materials Finder (grades K-12 plus higher education)

 http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/

 Telescopies From the Ground Up (Grades K-4)

http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/resources/explorations/groundup/

NASA World Wind (Grades 5-8)

http://worldwind.arc.nasa.gov/java/

Exploring Space Through Algebra (Grades 9-12)

http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Exploring_Space_Through_Algebra_Orion.html

Inventions and Inventions:  Space Travel (K-5)

http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/inventors-and-inventions-2-air-and-space.cfm

Understanding the Universe (Grades 6-8)

http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/understanding-the-universe.cfm

Out of This World! Space lesson plans

http://osr.org/en-us/articles/great-space-and-astronomy-lesson-plan-ideas/

The Size and Distance of the Planets lesson plan

http://cse.ssl.berkeley.edu/AtHomeAstronomy/activity_10.html

Eyes on the Sky-Feet on the Ground lesson plans

http://hea-www.harvard.edu/ECT/the_book/index.html

Views of the Solar System

http://www.solarviews.com/eng/homepage.htm

Lesson Plan on Sally Ride

http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/tlresources/units/byrnes-famous/sallride.html

Journey Through the Solar System-Lesson Plans

http://idahoptv.org/ntti/nttilessons/lessons2000/lau.html

 Angry Red Planet, An Interactive Space Mystery

http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/mspot/arp/index.php

Amazing Space

http://amazing-space.stsci.edu/

Search for and Make a Habitable Planet

http://astroventure.arc.nasa.gov/

Mysteries of Deep Space

http://www.pbs.org/deepspace/classroom/index.html

Stars:  A Mystery of Space

http://www.pbs.org/deepspace/classroom/index.html

A Virtual Journey Into Space

http://library.thinkquest.org/28327/

Thinkquest:  Space Travel

http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01212/

Make a Crater

http://lunar.arc.nasa.gov/education/activities/active15a.htm

Color of Stars Lesson Plan

http://stardate.org/teachers/plans/plan.php?lp_id=20

Make a Comet with Dry Ice

http://www.proteacher.org/a/35553_Make_a_Comet.html

Studying the Movement of Celestial Objects

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Learning Planet Sizes

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Birthday Moons

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Moon Quest (Grades 5-8)

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Every Picture Tells a Story (Duck Picture)

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Every Picture Tells a Story (Continued)

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Investigating the Changing Polar Caps

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Mars Quest (Create a brochure of Mars)

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

The First Manned Mission to Mars

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

How Much Would You Weigh on Distant Planets?

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Who Can Live Here?  Live in Extremes

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Sun’s Impact on Earth’s Temperature

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

The Life Cycle of Stars

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Enchanted Learning All About Astronomy

http://www.allaboutspace.com/subjects/astronomy/

 Searching for ProtoPlanetary Disks (seeking new planets online)

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

The Drake Equation:  Estimating the Number of Civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy

http://www.proteacher.com/redirect.php?goto=826

Welcome to Space Jeopardy! By Thinkquest

http://library.thinkquest.org/4236/game-index.htm

Jeopardy Game Lab on Space

http://jeopardylabs.com/play/space-jeopardy13

Powerpoint Presentations on Space

http://science.pppst.com/space/solarsystem.html

Space Jeopardy

http://www.isd12.org/gle/jeopardy/Jeopardy-Space_files/frame.htm

Video Clips from Mr. Donn

http://videoclips.mrdonn.org/space.html

Mr. Donn’s Space lesson plans

http://lessonplans.mrdonn.org/science.html

The 1962 Seattle World’s Fair (Mr. Donn)

http://americanhistory.mrdonn.org/Seattle.html

Mr. Donn’s Online Games (For Computer Lab)

http://game3a.com/en/1504IC/flash-game/mr-donn.html

Astronomy for Kids (Online Games for Computer Lab)

http://www.kidsastronomy.com/

NASA For Kids (Computer Lab)

http://kids.earth.nasa.gov/

Starchild (Computer Lab)

http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/StarChild.html

Starry Skies.com

http://starryskies.com/

Exploratorium Magazine for Kids Online

http://www.exploratorium.edu/exploring/space/index.html

The Solar System in Pictures (National Geographic)

http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/solar-system


 

SPACE UNIT

Virtual Tours

The Milky Way 

Astronomy Picture of the Day

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html

 Touring Mars With Google Earth

http://www.mnh.si.edu/panoramas/

 Arounder Moon Virtual Tour

http://moon.arounder.com/

 A Virtual Journey Into the Universe

http://library.thinkquest.org/28327/

 Google Earth Sky

http://www.google.com/gadgets/directory?synd=earth&preview=on&cat=sky


 

SPACE EXPLORATION PROJECT:
Make a Model of the Solar System

space

 

Your first project for this unit is to make a model of our Solar System, picturing the Sun, the eight planets and the draft planets that orbit it:  Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.  Pluto is now just listed as a large asteroid.  Extra credit is given for adding the moons of the planets and other parts of the solar system, such as asteroids, comets, and meteorites. 

Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) was a Polish astronomer who developed the Copernican System, a model of the solar system in which all of the planets orbit the Sun.

The solar system can be made out of any type of medium, even rocks or clay, so there is no limit to your creativity on this project. 

One inexpensive approach to this project could be using these materials:
   A round piece of cardboard about 1 foot across (the cardboard from a frozen pizza works well), colors of oak tag or construction paper, scissors, tape, string, markers, and a compass for making circles.

The project is due the second week of February, so have fun and be creative while researching the solar system.

C. Frank

Building A Structure : Model of the Solar System

Date Created: Oct 09, 2011 04:34 pm (UTC)

Teacher Name: Dr. Frank

 

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Modification/Testing

Clear evidence of troubleshooting, testing, and refinements based on data or scientific principles.

Clear evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements.

Some evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements.

Little evidence of troubleshooting, testing or refinement.

Function

Structure functions extraordinarily well, holding up under atypical stresses.

Structure functions well, holding up under typical stresses.

Structure functions pretty well, but deteriorates under typical stresses.

Fatal flaws in function with complete failure under typical stresses.

Scientific Knowledge

Explanations by all group members indicate a clear and accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

Explanations by all group members indicate a relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

Explanations by most group members indicate relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

Explanations by several members of the group do not illustrate much understanding of scientific principles underlying the construction and modifications.

Information Gathering

Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner.

Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner.

Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically.

Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate.

Plan

Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for all components.

Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for most components.

Plan provides clear measurements and labeling for most components.

Plan does not show measurements clearly or is otherwise inadequately labeled.

Construction -Materials

Appropriate materials were selected and creatively modified in ways that made them even better.

Appropriate materials were selected and there was an attempt at creative modification to make them even better.

Appropriate materials were selected.

Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a product that performed poorly.

Construction - Care Taken

Great care taken in construction process so that the structure is neat, attractive and follows plans accurately.

Constuction was careful and accurate for the most part, but 1-2 details could have been refined for a more attractive product.

Construction accurately followed the plans, but 3-4 details could have been refined for a more attractive product.

Construction appears careless or haphazard. Many details need refinement for a strong or attractive product.

Journal/Log - Content

Journal provides a complete record of planning, construction, testing, modifications, reasons for modifications, and some reflection about the strategies used and the results.

Journal provides a complete record of planning, construction, testing, modifications, and reasons for modifications.

Journal provides quite a bit of detail about planning, construction, testing, modifications, and reasons for modifications.

Journal provides very little detail about several aspects of the planning, construction, and testing process.

Journal/Log - Appearance

Several entries made and all are dated and neatly.

Several entries are made and most of the entries are dated and neatly entered.

Several entries are made and most of the entries are dated and legible.

Few entries are made AND/OR many entries are not dated or very difficult to read.