SAGE Curriculum for Elementary Level

 

The curriculum for gifted in elementary school follows a rotation program over a 5 year period. These interdisciplinary thematic study units form the core of the elementary gifted program as follows:

Year 2:

Law and Leadership

Employs problem solving, decision making and learning leadership/citizenship skills, as students complete assignments and experiences related to interpreting Georgia law as it applies to them.

Medieval Times

Discovery of the Middle Ages: reading, writing, and research on customs, literature, clothing, buildings, history, music, arts, and knights and kings; fairy tales in the oral traditions of the times with opportunities for puppetry and play writing.

 

 Space Exploration

Uses problem solving, research, and experimentation to study space travel and solar system

 curriculum not included in their regular classrooms while also developing broad-based concepts of exploration in areas other than space.

*Tessellations

Any repeating pattern of interlocking shapes that cover a plane with a pattern, infused in the thematic lessons throughout the year, with emphasis on symmetry and the stained glass art of Medieval Times.


LAW AND LEADERSHIP

GIFTED UNIT

Employs problem solving, decision making and learning leadership/citizenship skills, as students complete assignments and experiences related to interpreting Georgia law as it applies to them.

 Week 1

Essential Question:  As a gifted student, why is it important to study the Law and Leadership skills?   What can we learn about Old Babylonian society from Hammurabi's Code?

Overview of the Foundations of the Law System of the United States

     Hammurabi’s Code

     Athenian Law

     Roman Law

     Magna Carta/ Middle Ages

     British Laws 

     U.S. Declaration of Independence

     The U.S. Bill of Rights

     U.S. Constitution

     Children’s Legal Rights Around the World

 Legal Vocabulary For Students

     http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/kidspage/glossary.html

 Introduction to Law

     Opening the Unit

     Hammurabi’s Code

          Ancient History Sourcebook

           http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/hamcode.html

           http://public.wsu.edu/~dee/MESO/CODE.HTM

            Yale Law School’s Interpretation of Hammurabi’s Codes of Law

           http://www.phillipmartin.info/hammurabi/hammurabi_codeindex.htm

           Hammurabi:  Stories and Games

           http://mesopotamia.mrdonn.org/games.html 

     Online Activities: 

                   You Be the Judge on Hammurabi’s Code of Laws 

                   http://www.phillipmartin.info/hammurabi/hammurabi_situation_index.htm

                    Hammurabi PPT:  The Classic Game of Strategy and Resource Allocation

                   http://www.hammurabigame.com/hammurabi-game.php

                   Superstition and Steady State Learning

                  http://www.huangxiaofei.com/documents/econ506a/lec16.superstition.steady.state.pdf

                          Are You Smarter Than Hammurabi? Jeopardy Game

                     http://jeopardylabs.com/play/are-you-smarter-than-hammurabi3

 

Book:  How Did They Do That in Ancient Mesopotamia? By Elizabeth Scholl 

 Ancient Mesopotamia Jeopardy Games http://ancienthistory.mrdonn.org/Mesopotamia.html

Writing Activity:  Cuneiform

     http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/westasia/literature/index.htm

 Hammurabi Simulation

     http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/hammurabis-code-what-does-it-tell-us-about-old-babylonia#section-16405

 Video:  Ancient Mesopotamia

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:   Inside  the Courtroom

                                                                       http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/kidspage/index.html                                                        

Week 2

Essential Question:  How Did the Athenians invent Democracy?

 Introduction to Athenian Law

     Ancient Greek Government

     http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/index.htm

     Greek Law Courts

     http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/courts.htm

     The Ancient Athenians Invented Democracy

     http://greece.mrdonn.org/athensdemocracy.html

 History of Athens

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/government/athens.htm

 Poetry Activity:   Solon the Lawmaker of Athens

    http://www.e-classics.com/solon.htm

 Women’s Rights:  Women and Gender in Classical Athens

http://greece.mrdonn.org/women.html

http://mailer.fsu.edu/~jsicking/cla3501/lec8.html

 The Courts in Athens legal system  http://greece.mrdonn.org/athenscourt.html

 Athenian Writing:

     Interactive English Games and Activities

     http://primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/literacy/index.htm

     The Greek Alphabet

     http://www.omniglot.com/writing/greek.htm

     http://greece.mrdonn.org/alphabet.html

 Book:  If I Were a Kid in Ancient Greece by Cobblestone

 Video:  Ancient Athens, Greece

 Ancient Greek Jeopardy Games

http://ancienthistory.pppst.com/greece/jeopardy.html

 Math Activity:  Math Olympics

http://www.mathplayground.com/olympic_math1.html

  Writing Activity:  The Greek Scroll

http://library.thinkquest.org/CR0210200/ancient_greece/directions.htm

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY: 

Inside the Courtroom:  How Does This Relate to What We Have Learned?

http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/kidspage/index.html

Week 3

Essential Question:  How did the laws in republic Rome influence the future of the legal system?

 Powerpoint on Ancient Rome  http://rome.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-etruscans.html

 Justinian’s Code http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/justinianscode.html

 The Twelve Tables  (Bill of Rights) http://rome.mrdonn.org/12tables.html

 Art Activity:  Create the Roman style of clothing

Roman Women and the Legal  System  http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/clothing2.html

 Book:  If I Were a Kid in Ancient Rome by Cobblestone

Activity:  Ancient Rome Trivia Game

http://www.surfnetkids.com/games/ancient_rome_quiz.htm

 Ancient Rome Jeopardy Games  http://rome.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-jeopardy.html

 Activity:  Powerpoint games on the Republic of Ancient Rome and its legal system

http://rome.mrdonn.org/powerpoints.html

 Video:  Ancient Civilizations for Children:  Rome, Italy

Ancient Romans in Britain  http://rome.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-britain.html

King Charlemagne:  Trial by Jury vs. Trial by Ordeal  http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/charlemagne.html

King Charlemagne powerpoint presentations  http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-charlemagne.html

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:

The Three Little Pigs vs. the Big Bad Wolf (Assault)  How does this relate to what we have learned?

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html 

 

Week 4

Essential Question:  How did the Doomsday Book created by William the Conqueror change the way medieval people followed laws and paid taxes?  How did the creation of the Magna Carta change the rights of the common man vs. the laws of a King?

The High Middle Ages (Connecting the Magna Carta to our present day Constitution 

 http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=1FDEEB30-A5F0-410F-9140-34CA7E6C484F&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US#

Runnymeade, England June 19, 1215:  The Magna Carta

http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=E4583B87-6DC3-475C-8464-72121F477998&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US

Medieval Legal History Source Online http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook-law.html

Feudalism  powerpoint presentations  http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-feudalism.html

Laws of William the Conqueror  http://www.britannia.com/history/monarchs/laws.html

The Doomsday Book  http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/domesday.html    

King John and the Magna Carta (1215) powerpoint presentation

http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/powerpoints-rise-of-monarchies.html

The Magna Carta (1215)

http://eawc.evansville.edu/anthology/magnacarta.htm

  King John and the Magna Carta

  http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/medieval/history/highmiddle/john.htm

Rise of Monarchies and the Magna Carta

 http://medievaleurope.mrdonn.org/magnacarta.html

 The Long Arm of the Law

http://www.regia.org/law.htm

 The Magna Carta and the U.S. Constitution

http://www.usconstitution.net/magna.html

  Activity:  History Games for Kids

                  http://www.kidspast.com/history-games/index.php

 Activity:  U.S. Constitution Jeopardy Game online

                  http://www.hardin.k12.ky.us/res_techn/countyjeopardygames.htm

 Other Activities:   Free Clip Art for the Study of the Magna Carta

                                http://www.wartgames.com/themes/clipart.html

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Trial of The Three Little Pigs vs. the Big Bad Wolf conclusion (Assault)  How does this relate to what we have learned so far?

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html

 

Week 5

Essential Question:  What fundamental British laws have we utilized to develop the U.S. legal system? 

 British History for Kids  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/forkids/

 United Kingdom powerpoint presentations  http://countries.pppst.com/unitedkingdom.html

 British Laws  http://www.joke-archives.com/rules/englishlaws.html

 Duke Law Library:  British Law  http://www.law.duke.edu/lib/researchguides/english

 Ye Olde English Sayings  http://www.goodwords.com/sayings/

 Best British Hoaxes and Pranks (Legally)  http://best-hoaxes.blogspot.com/2009/02/20-strange-and-funny-uk-laws.html

 The World’s Strangest Laws  http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/law/article2251280.ece

 The Birth of Parliament  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/middle_ages/birth_of_parliament_01.shtml

 Activties:  Writing powerpoint presentations for kids  http://writing.pppst.com/essays.html

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Trial of Goldilocks vs. the Three Bears (Theft, Break-in)

      American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html                   

 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP

GIFTED UNIT

 

Employs problem solving, decision making and learning leadership/citizenship skills, as students complete assignments and experiences related to interpreting Georgia law as it applies to them.

 

Week 6

Essential Question:  How did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Declaration of Independence?

Legal Vocabulary For Students

     http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/kidspage/glossary.html

  History for Kids – Declaration of Independence

http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/northamerica/after1500/government/declaration.htm

     Kids Connect - Declaration of Independence

http://www.kidskonnect.com/subject-index/16-history/436-declaration-of-independence.html

 Congress For Kids

http://www.congressforkids.net/Independence_declaration_1.htm

 Social Studies for Kids

http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/articles/ushistory/declaration.htm

 America’s Freedom Documents-Declaration of Independence

http://www.earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/freedom/doi/

 Declaration of Independence Powerpoint presentations from Mr. Donn

http://government.pppst.com/declaration.html

 Book:  Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?  By Jean Fritz

            Can’t You Make Them Behave, King George? By Jean Fritz

           And Them What Happened, Paul Revere?  By Jean Fritz

 Online Activities: 

     Constitution Day

     http://cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu/davidj/Special%20Events/Constitution%20Day/constitution_day.htm

 

     Declaration of Independence Jeopardy Game

     http://www.superteachertools.com/jeopardy/usergames/Mar201012/game1269265877.php

         Declaration of Independence Jeopardy Game

     http://jeopardylabs.com/play/declaration-of-independence4

      Fun Trivia Game

     http://www.funtrivia.com/playquiz/quiz824349725f8.html

 

     People Trivia Contest

  http://www.peoplequiz.com/quizzes-2687-  A_Patriotic_Quiz_about_the_Declaration_of_Independence.html

 

Fun Art Activity:  Cascading Star Mobile

http://www.independencedayfun.com/159/cascading-star-mobile/

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:   The Trial of Goldilocks vs. the Three Bears (continued)

       American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html                                                      

Week 7

Essential Question:  Why did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Bill of Rights?

  America’s Freedom Documents – U.S. Bill of Rights

 http://www.earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/freedom/bill/

 Kidipede-U.S. Bill of Rights

 http://kidipede.net/learn/northamerica/after1500/government/billofrights.htm

 

Social Studies for Kids-U.S. Bill of Rights

 http://www.socialstudiesforkids.com/wwww/us/billofrightsdef.htm

 Gifted Childrens’ Bill of Rights

http://www.nagc.org/uploadedFiles/PHP/Bill%20of%20rights.pdf

Gifted Kid’s Bill of Rights

http://www.lessontutor.com/ml3.html

 Congress for Kids – Bill of Rights

http://www.congressforkids.net/games/billofrights/2_billofrights.htm

  Bill of Rights Powerpoint Presentations

http://government.pppst.com/billofrights.html

 Bill of Rights Powerpoint Presentations from Mr. Donn

http://government.pppst.com/billofrights.html

 Articles of the Confederation

http://government.pppst.com/articles.html

 Online Activities:

     Constitution Day

     http://cfbstaff.cfbisd.edu/davidj/Special%20Events/Constitution%20Day/constitution_day.htm

      Bill of Rights Match Game

     http://www.texaslre.org/BOR/billofrights.html

      Bill of Rights and Amendments Trivial Game

     http://www.funtrivia.com/playquiz/quiz7685e4760.html

      Save the Bill of Rights Game

     http://constitutioncenter.org/BillOfRightsGame/

Jeopardy Games

     Bill of Rights Jeopardy Game

     http://www.superteachertools.com/jeopardy/usergames/Apr201015/game1271253698.php

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Trial of the Wicked Witch vs. Snow White

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html 

Week 8

Essential Question:  How did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Constitution?

 America’s Freedom Documents-U.S. Constitution

http://www.earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/freedom/constitution/

 Things That Are Not In the U.S. Constitution

http://www.usconstitution.net/constnot.html

U.S. Constitution Powerpoint presentation from Mr. Donn

http://government.pppst.com/constitution.html

 Book:  Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz

            Where Was Patrick Henry on the 29th of May? By Jean Fritz

 Activity:  U.S. Constitution Jeopardy Game online

                  http://www.hardin.k12.ky.us/res_techn/countyjeopardygames.htm

 Online Activities:

     Trivia Game

     http://www.surfnetkids.com/games/ancient_rome_quiz.htm

          Free Videos from Mr. Donn

     http://videoclips.mrdonn.org/government.html

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Trial of the Wicked Witch vs. Snow White (continued)

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html

Week 9

Essential Question:  What are childrens’ legal rights around the world?

 U.S. Department of Labor

http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/youthlabor/

 Timeline on Child Labor Laws

http://www.continuetolearn.uiowa.edu/laborctr/child_labor/about/us_history.html

 Fair Labor Standards Act

http://www.stopchildlabor.org/USchildlabor/fact1.htm

 Effects and Consequences of the Industrial Revolution

http://www.icsd.k12.ny.us/legacy/acs/library/ushistory/laborwebquest/index.html

 Immigration, Unions and Child Labor Laws of the 1900s

http://www.johnmuirsl.org/Immigration,%20unions,%20and%20child%20labor%20in%20the%20early%201900's.html

 Virtual Tour of Ellis Island

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/

 Kid Info and the Industrial Revolution

http://www.kidinfo.com/american_history/industrial_revolution.html

 Industrial Revolution for Kids from Mr. Donn (includes free videos, ppts, games)

http://americanhistory.mrdonn.org/industrial.html

Powerpoint Presentations on Child Labor

http://socialstudies.pppst.com/childlabor.html

 Child Labor in U.S. History

 http://www.continuetolearn.uiowa.edu/laborctr/child_labor/about/us_history.html

 Teaching with Documents:  Child Labor

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/hine-photos/#documents

 Teaching Activities with Documents:  Child Labor (above site)

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/hine-photos/activities.html

 UNICEF on the Rights of Children

http://www.unicef.org/crc/

Internet Safety for Kids

http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/family/net_safety.html

 Math:  Child Labor in the U.S.

http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/whaples.childlabor

 Online Activity: 

      BBC Victorian Britain and Child Labor

     http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/victorian_britain/

      Child Labor Laws Activities

     http://www.wartgames.com/themes/world/childlabor.html

 Book:  Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

 SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:  The Trial of the Village of Sheepfold vs. Joey Wolfcrier

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html

Week 10

Essential Question:  What are the legal human rights around the world?

 United Nations Agreements on Human Rights

http://www.hrweb.org/legal/undocs.html

Guide to Human Rights Laws

http://www.hg.org/human-rights.html

 Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:  Human Rights

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rights-human/

 Moral vs. Legal Rights

http://www.iep.utm.edu/hum-rts/#SH3a

 Human and Legal Rights Under International Law

http://www.gsdrc.org/go/topic-guides/human-rights/human-rights-legal-framework

 The Civil Rights Movement and Segregation

http://americanhistory.mrdonn.org/CivilRights.html

 CRIME

Crime Definitions

http://www.criminalattorney.com/crime_definitions.htm

                   

Probable Cause  Incident

http://www.criminalattorney.com/news/illegal-search/

 

SURPRISE FOCUS OF THE DAY:   The Trial of the Village of Sheepfold vs. Joey Wolfcrier (continued)

     American Bar Association  http://www.americanbar.org/aba.html  

 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP ANTICIPATION GUIDE

1.  There are no legal rights for children in the U.S.                                     

2.  UNICEF has political power in the world. 

3.  The Bill of Rights include children’s rights in this country.

4.  People have the right to a great education in the U.S.

5.  The U.S. Constitution is based on laws set by other countries.
6.  The United Nations has legal right to tell countries what to do.
7.  Immigrants have legal rights once they enter the United States.

8.  Homeowners have the right to put fences up in their yards.

         

 

Law and Leadership

Essential Questions

 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP GIFTED UNIT

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Why is it important to study the Law and Leadership skills? 

What can we learn about Old Babylonian society from Hammurabi's Code?

How Did the Athenians invent Democracy?

How did the laws in republic Rome influence the future of the legal system?

How did the Doomsday Book created by William the Conqueror change the way medieval people followed laws and paid taxes? 

How did the creation of the Magna Carta change the rights of the common man vs. the laws of a King?

What fundamental British laws have we utilized to develop the U.S. legal system? 

How did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Declaration of Independence?

 Why did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Bill of Rights?

 How did the founding fathers create and implement the U.S. Constitution?

 What are childrens’ legal rights around the world?

What are the legal human rights around the world?

 

 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP GPS STANDARDS

(Donated from Laurie Lawrence)

 

Reading

ELA5R2

The student consistently reads at least twenty-five books or book equivalents (approximately 1,000,000 words) each year. The materials should include traditional and contemporary literature (both fiction and non-fiction) as well as magazines, newspapers, textbooks, and electronic material. Such reading should represent a diverse collection of material from at least three different literary forms and from at least five different writers.

 

ELA5R1

The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.

a.      Identifies and analyzes the elements of setting, characterization, and conflict in plot.

g. Applies knowledge of the concept that theme refers to the message about life and the

world that the author wants us to understand whether implied or stated.

i. Makes judgments and inferences about setting, characters, and events and supports

them with elaborating and convincing evidence from the text.

 

 ELA5R3

The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it  correctly in reading and writing.

 

 Writing

 

ELA5W1

 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure.

 

ELA5W2

The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

 

ELA5W3

 The student uses research and technology to support writing.

 

ELA5W4

The student consistently uses a writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing.

 

Conventions

 

ELA5C1

The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

  

Listening/Speaking/Viewing

 ELA5LSV1

 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions.

 

 ELA5LSV2

The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.

 

 Characteristics of Science

 S5CS1

Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

 

 S5CS2

Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

 S5CS3

Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

 

 S5CS4

Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

 

 S5CS5

Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

 

 S5CS6

Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.

 

 S5CS7

Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

 

 S5CS8

Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

 

SS

SS6CG1 The student will compare and contrast various forms of government.

a. Describe the ways government systems distribute power: unitary, confederation, and federal.

b. Explain how governments determine citizen participation: autocratic, oligarchic, and democratic.

c. Describe the two predominate forms of democratic governments: parliamentary and presidential.

 

 SS8H4 The student will describe the impact of events that led to the ratification of

the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

a. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of both the Georgia Constitution of 1777 and the Articles of Confederation and explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation led to a need to revise the Articles.

b. Describe the role of Georgia at the Constitutional Convention of 1787; include the role of Abraham Baldwin and William Few, and reasons why Georgia ratified the new constitution.

 

SS8CG1 The student will describe the role of citizens under Georgia’s constitution.

a. Explain the basic structure of the Georgia state constitution.

b. Explain the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances.

c. Describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

d. Explain voting qualifications and elections in Georgia.

e. Explain the role of political parties in government.

f. Identify wisdom, justice, and moderation as the three principles of the Pledge of Allegiance to the Georgia Flag.

 

S8CG2 The student will analyze the role of the legislative branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the qualifications, term, election, and duties of members of the General Assembly.

b. Describe the organization of the General Assembly, with emphasis on leadership and the committee system.

c. Evaluate how the legislative branch fulfills its role as the lawmaking body for the state of Georgia.

 

SS8CG3 The student will analyze the role of the executive branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the qualifications, term, election, and duties of the governor and lieutenant governor.

b. Describe the organization of the executive branch, with emphasis on major policy areas of state programs; include education, human resources, public safety, transportation, economic development, and natural resources.

c. Evaluate how the executive branch fulfills its role through state agencies that administer programs and enforce laws

 

SS8CG4 The student will analyze the role of the judicial branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the structure of the court system in Georgia including trial and appellate procedures and how judges are selected.

b. Explain the difference between criminal law and civil law.

c. Describe the adult justice system, emphasizing the different jurisdictions, terminology, and steps in the criminal justice process.

d. Describe ways to avoid trouble and settle disputes peacefully.

e. Evaluate how the judicial branch fulfills its role in interpreting the laws of Georgia and ensuring justice in our legal system.

 

SS8CG5 The student will analyze the role of local governments in the state of Georgia.

a. Explain the origins, functions, purposes, and differences of county and city governments in Georgia.

b. Compare and contrast the weak mayor-council, the strong mayor-council, and the council-manager forms of city government.

c. Describe the functions of special-purpose governments.

d. Evaluate the role of local government working with state agencies to administer state programs.

 

SS8CG6 The student will explain how the Georgia court system treats juvenile offenders.

a. Explain the difference between delinquent behavior and unruly behavior and the consequences of each

b. Describe the rights of juveniles when taken into custody.

c. Describe the juvenile justice system, emphasizing the different jurisdictions, terminology, and steps in the juvenile justice process.

d. Explain the seven delinquent behaviors that can subject juvenile offenders to the adult

 

 

 The government course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students examine the philosophical foundations of the United States government and how that philosophy developed. Students also examine the structure and function of the United States government and its relationship to states and citizens.

SSCG1 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the political philosophies that shaped the development of United States constitutional government.

a. Analyze key ideas of limited government and the rule of law as seen in the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, and the English Bill of Rights.

b. Analyze the writings of Hobbes (Leviathan), Locke (Second Treatise on Government), and Montesquieu (The Spirit of Laws) as they affect our concept of government.

 

SSCG2 The student will analyze the natural rights philosophy and the nature of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

a. Compare and contrast the Declaration of Independence and the Social Contract Theory.

b. Evaluate the Declaration of Independence as a persuasive argument.

 

SSCG3 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the United States Constitution.

a. Explain the main ideas in debate over ratification; include those in The Federalist.

b. Analyze the purpose of government stated in the Preamble of the United States Constitution.

c. Explain the fundamental principles upon which the United States Constitution is based; include the rule of law, popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism.

 

SSCG4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers of the national government.

a. Describe the structure and powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

b. Analyze the relationship between the three branches in a system of checks and balances and separation of powers.

 

SSCG5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the federal system of government described in the United States Constitution.

a. Explain the relationship of state governments to the national government.

b. Define the difference between enumerated and implied powers.

c. Describe the extent to which power is shared.

d. Identify powers denied to state and national governments.

e. Analyze the ongoing debate that focuses on the balance of power between state and national governments.

f. Analyze the supremacy clause found in Article VI and the role of the U.S. Constitution as the “supreme law of the land.”

g. Explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag of the United States.

 

SSCG6 The student will demonstrate knowledge of civil liberties and civil rights.

a. Examine the Bill of Rights with emphasis on First Amendment freedoms.

b. Analyze due process law expressed in the 5th and 14th Amendments.

c. Explain selective incorporation of the Bill of Rights.

d. Explain how government seeks to maintain the balance between individual liberties and the public interest.

e. Explain every citizen’s right to be treated equally under the law.

 

SSCG7 The student will describe how thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by obeying the law, paying taxes, serving on a jury, participating in the political process, performing public service, registering for military duty, being informed about current issues, and respecting differing opinions.

SSCG8 The student will demonstrate knowledge of local, state, and national elections.

a. Describe the organization, role, and constituencies of political parties.

b. Describe the nomination and election process.

c. Examine campaign funding and spending.

d. Analyze the influence of media coverage, campaign advertising, and public opinion polls.

e. Identify how amendments extend the right to vote.

 

SSCG9 The student will explain the differences between the House of Representatives and the Senate, with emphasis on terms of office, powers, organization, leadership, and representation of each house.

SSCG10 The student will describe the legislative process including the roles played

by committees and leadership.

a. Explain the steps in the legislative process.

b. Explain the function of various leadership positions within the legislature.

 

SSCG11 The student will describe the influence of lobbyists (business, labor, professional organizations) and special interest groups on the legislative process.

a. Explain the function of lobbyists.

b. Describe the laws and rules that govern lobbyists.

c. Explain the function of special interest groups.

 

SSCG12 The student will analyze the various roles played by the President of the

United States; include Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, chief executive, chief agenda setter, representative of the nation, chief of state, foreign policy leader, and party leader.

SSCG13 The student will describe the qualifications for becoming President of the

United States.

a. Explain the written qualifications for President of the United States.

b. Describe unwritten qualifications common to past presidents.

 

SSCG14 The student will explain the impeachment process and its usage for elected officials.

a. Explain the impeachment process as defined in the U.S. Constitution.

b. Describe the impeachment proceedings of Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton.

 

SSCG15 The student will explain the functions of the departments and agencies of the federal bureaucracy.

a. Compare and contrast the organization and responsibilities of independent regulatory agencies, government corporations, and executive agencies.

b. Explain the functions of the Cabinet.

 

SSCG16 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the operation of the federal judiciary.

a. Explain the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, federal courts and the state courts.

b. Examine how John Marshall established the Supreme Court as an independent, coequal branch of government through his opinions in Marbury v. Madison.

c. Describe how the Supreme Court decides cases.

d. Compare the philosophies of judicial activism and judicial restraint.

 

SSCG17 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers

of state and local government described in the Georgia Constitution.

a. Examine the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

b. Examine the structure of local governments with emphasis on county, city, and town.

c. Identify current state and local officials.

d. Analyze the relationship among state and local governments.

e. Evaluate direct democracy by the initiative, referendum, and recall processes.

SSCG18 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the powers of Georgia’s state

and local governments.

a. Examine the powers of state and local government.

b. Examine sources of revenue received by each level of government.

c. Analyze the services provided by state and local government.

 

SSCG19 The student will compare and contrast governments that are unitary, confederal, and federal; autocratic, oligarchic and democratic; and presidential and parliamentary.

SSCG20 The student will describe the tools used to carry out United States foreign policy (diplomacy; economic, military, and humanitarian aid; treaties; sanctions and military intervention).

SSCG21 The student will describe the causes and effects of criminal activity.

a. Examine the nature and causes of crimes.

b. Explain the effects criminal acts have on their intended victims.

c. Categorize different types of crimes.

d. Explain the different types of defenses used by perpetrators of crime.

 

SSCG22 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the criminal justice process.

a. Analyze the steps in the criminal justice process.

b. Explain an individual’s due process rights.

c. Describe the steps in a criminal trial or civil suit.

d. Examine the different types of sentences a convicted person can receive.

 

 

 SSWH1 The student will analyze the origins, structures, and interactions of complex societies in the ancient Eastern Mediterranean from 3500 BCE to 500 BCE.

a. Describe the development of Mesopotamian societies; include the religious, cultural, economic, and political facets of society, with attention to Hammurabi’s law code.

b. Describe the relationship of religion and political authority in Ancient Egypt.

 

 

 

 SSWH3 The student will examine the political, philosophical, and cultural interaction of Classical Mediterranean societies from 700 BCE to 400 CE.

a. Compare the origins and structure of the Greek polis, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire.

b. Identify the ideas and impact of important individuals; include Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and describe the diffusion of Greek culture by Aristotle’s pupil Alexander the Great and the impact of Julius and Augustus Caesar.

c. Analyze the contributions of Hellenistic and Roman culture; include law, gender, and science.

 

SSWH7 The student will analyze European medieval society with regard to culture, politics, society, and economics.

a. Explain the manorial system and feudalism; include the status of peasants and feudal monarchies and the importance of Charlemagne.

b. Describe the political impact of Christianity; include Pope Gregory VII and King Henry IV of Germany (Holy Roman Emperor).

 


 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP GPS STANDARDS

(Donated from Laurie Lawrence)

Reading

ELA5R2

The student consistently reads at least twenty-five books or book equivalents (approximately 1,000,000 words) each year. The materials should include traditional and contemporary literature (both fiction and non-fiction) as well as magazines, newspapers, textbooks, and electronic material. Such reading should represent a diverse collection of material from at least three different literary forms and from at least five different writers.

 ELA5R1

The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts.

a.      Identifies and analyzes the elements of setting, characterization, and conflict in plot.

g. Applies knowledge of the concept that theme refers to the message about life and the

world that the author wants us to understand whether implied or stated.

i. Makes judgments and inferences about setting, characters, and events and supports

them with elaborating and convincing evidence from the text.

  ELA5R3

The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it  correctly in reading and writing.

  Writing

 ELA5W1

 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure.

 ELA5W2

The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

 ELA5W3

 The student uses research and technology to support writing.

 ELA5W4

The student consistently uses a writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing.

 Conventions

 ELA5C1

The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats.

 Listening/Speaking/Viewing

 ELA5LSV1

 The student participates in student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and group verbal interactions.

  ELA5LSV2

The student listens to and views various forms of text and media in order to gather and share information, persuade others, and express and understand ideas.

  Characteristics of Science

 S5CS1

Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

  S5CS2

Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

  S5CS3

Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

 

 S5CS4

Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

 S5CS5

Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

  S5CS6

Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.

  S5CS7

Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

  S5CS8

Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

 SS

SS6CG1 The student will compare and contrast various forms of government.

a. Describe the ways government systems distribute power: unitary, confederation, and federal.

b. Explain how governments determine citizen participation: autocratic, oligarchic, and democratic.

c. Describe the two predominate forms of democratic governments: parliamentary and presidential.

 

 SS8H4 The student will describe the impact of events that led to the ratification of

the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

a. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of both the Georgia Constitution of 1777 and the Articles of Confederation and explain how weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation led to a need to revise the Articles.

b. Describe the role of Georgia at the Constitutional Convention of 1787; include the role of Abraham Baldwin and William Few, and reasons why Georgia ratified the new constitution.

 

SS8CG1 The student will describe the role of citizens under Georgia’s constitution.

a. Explain the basic structure of the Georgia state constitution.

b. Explain the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances.

c. Describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

d. Explain voting qualifications and elections in Georgia.

e. Explain the role of political parties in government.

f. Identify wisdom, justice, and moderation as the three principles of the Pledge of Allegiance to the Georgia Flag.

 

S8CG2 The student will analyze the role of the legislative branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the qualifications, term, election, and duties of members of the General Assembly.

b. Describe the organization of the General Assembly, with emphasis on leadership and the committee system.

c. Evaluate how the legislative branch fulfills its role as the lawmaking body for the state of Georgia.

 

SS8CG3 The student will analyze the role of the executive branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the qualifications, term, election, and duties of the governor and lieutenant governor.

b. Describe the organization of the executive branch, with emphasis on major policy areas of state programs; include education, human resources, public safety, transportation, economic development, and natural resources.

c. Evaluate how the executive branch fulfills its role through state agencies that administer programs and enforce laws

 

SS8CG4 The student will analyze the role of the judicial branch in Georgia state government.

a. Explain the structure of the court system in Georgia including trial and appellate procedures and how judges are selected.

b. Explain the difference between criminal law and civil law.

c. Describe the adult justice system, emphasizing the different jurisdictions, terminology, and steps in the criminal justice process.

d. Describe ways to avoid trouble and settle disputes peacefully.

e. Evaluate how the judicial branch fulfills its role in interpreting the laws of Georgia and ensuring justice in our legal system.

 

SS8CG5 The student will analyze the role of local governments in the state of Georgia.

a. Explain the origins, functions, purposes, and differences of county and city governments in Georgia.

b. Compare and contrast the weak mayor-council, the strong mayor-council, and the council-manager forms of city government.

c. Describe the functions of special-purpose governments.

d. Evaluate the role of local government working with state agencies to administer state programs.

 

SS8CG6 The student will explain how the Georgia court system treats juvenile offenders.

a. Explain the difference between delinquent behavior and unruly behavior and the consequences of each

b. Describe the rights of juveniles when taken into custody.

c. Describe the juvenile justice system, emphasizing the different jurisdictions, terminology, and steps in the juvenile justice process.

d. Explain the seven delinquent behaviors that can subject juvenile offenders to the adult

 

 

 The government course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students examine the philosophical foundations of the United States government and how that philosophy developed. Students also examine the structure and function of the United States government and its relationship to states and citizens.

SSCG1 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the political philosophies that shaped the development of United States constitutional government.

a. Analyze key ideas of limited government and the rule of law as seen in the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, and the English Bill of Rights.

b. Analyze the writings of Hobbes (Leviathan), Locke (Second Treatise on Government), and Montesquieu (The Spirit of Laws) as they affect our concept of government.

 

SSCG2 The student will analyze the natural rights philosophy and the nature of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

a. Compare and contrast the Declaration of Independence and the Social Contract Theory.

b. Evaluate the Declaration of Independence as a persuasive argument.

 

SSCG3 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the United States Constitution.

a. Explain the main ideas in debate over ratification; include those in The Federalist.

b. Analyze the purpose of government stated in the Preamble of the United States Constitution.

c. Explain the fundamental principles upon which the United States Constitution is based; include the rule of law, popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism.

 

SSCG4 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers of the national government.

a. Describe the structure and powers of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

b. Analyze the relationship between the three branches in a system of checks and balances and separation of powers.

SSCG5 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the federal system of government described in the United States Constitution.

a. Explain the relationship of state governments to the national government.

b. Define the difference between enumerated and implied powers.

c. Describe the extent to which power is shared.

d. Identify powers denied to state and national governments.

e. Analyze the ongoing debate that focuses on the balance of power between state and national governments.

f. Analyze the supremacy clause found in Article VI and the role of the U.S. Constitution as the “supreme law of the land.”

g. Explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag of the United States.

 

SSCG6 The student will demonstrate knowledge of civil liberties and civil rights.

a. Examine the Bill of Rights with emphasis on First Amendment freedoms.

b. Analyze due process law expressed in the 5th and 14th Amendments.

c. Explain selective incorporation of the Bill of Rights.

d. Explain how government seeks to maintain the balance between individual liberties and the public interest.

e. Explain every citizen’s right to be treated equally under the law.

 

SSCG7 The student will describe how thoughtful and effective participation in civic life is characterized by obeying the law, paying taxes, serving on a jury, participating in the political process, performing public service, registering for military duty, being informed about current issues, and respecting differing opinions.

SSCG8 The student will demonstrate knowledge of local, state, and national elections.

a. Describe the organization, role, and constituencies of political parties.

b. Describe the nomination and election process.

c. Examine campaign funding and spending.

d. Analyze the influence of media coverage, campaign advertising, and public opinion polls.

e. Identify how amendments extend the right to vote.

 

SSCG9 The student will explain the differences between the House of Representatives and the Senate, with emphasis on terms of office, powers, organization, leadership, and representation of each house.

SSCG10 The student will describe the legislative process including the roles played

by committees and leadership.

a. Explain the steps in the legislative process.

b. Explain the function of various leadership positions within the legislature.

 

SSCG11 The student will describe the influence of lobbyists (business, labor, professional organizations) and special interest groups on the legislative process.

a. Explain the function of lobbyists.

b. Describe the laws and rules that govern lobbyists.

c. Explain the function of special interest groups.

 

SSCG12 The student will analyze the various roles played by the President of the

United States; include Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, chief executive, chief agenda setter, representative of the nation, chief of state, foreign policy leader, and party leader.

SSCG13 The student will describe the qualifications for becoming President of the

United States.

a. Explain the written qualifications for President of the United States.

b. Describe unwritten qualifications common to past presidents.

 

SSCG14 The student will explain the impeachment process and its usage for elected officials.

a. Explain the impeachment process as defined in the U.S. Constitution.

b. Describe the impeachment proceedings of Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton.

 

SSCG15 The student will explain the functions of the departments and agencies of the federal bureaucracy.

a. Compare and contrast the organization and responsibilities of independent regulatory agencies, government corporations, and executive agencies.

b. Explain the functions of the Cabinet.

 

SSCG16 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the operation of the federal judiciary.

a. Explain the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, federal courts and the state courts.

b. Examine how John Marshall established the Supreme Court as an independent, coequal branch of government through his opinions in Marbury v. Madison.

c. Describe how the Supreme Court decides cases.

d. Compare the philosophies of judicial activism and judicial restraint.

 

SSCG17 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the organization and powers

of state and local government described in the Georgia Constitution.

a. Examine the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.

b. Examine the structure of local governments with emphasis on county, city, and town.

c. Identify current state and local officials.

d. Analyze the relationship among state and local governments.

e. Evaluate direct democracy by the initiative, referendum, and recall processes.

SSCG18 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the powers of Georgia’s state

and local governments.

a. Examine the powers of state and local government.

b. Examine sources of revenue received by each level of government.

c. Analyze the services provided by state and local government.

 

SSCG19 The student will compare and contrast governments that are unitary, confederal, and federal; autocratic, oligarchic and democratic; and presidential and parliamentary.

SSCG20 The student will describe the tools used to carry out United States foreign policy (diplomacy; economic, military, and humanitarian aid; treaties; sanctions and military intervention).

SSCG21 The student will describe the causes and effects of criminal activity.

a. Examine the nature and causes of crimes.

b. Explain the effects criminal acts have on their intended victims.

c. Categorize different types of crimes.

d. Explain the different types of defenses used by perpetrators of crime.

 

SSCG22 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the criminal justice process.

a. Analyze the steps in the criminal justice process.

b. Explain an individual’s due process rights.

c. Describe the steps in a criminal trial or civil suit.

d. Examine the different types of sentences a convicted person can receive.

  

 SSWH1 The student will analyze the origins, structures, and interactions of complex societies in the ancient Eastern Mediterranean from 3500 BCE to 500 BCE.

a. Describe the development of Mesopotamian societies; include the religious, cultural, economic, and political facets of society, with attention to Hammurabi’s law code.

b. Describe the relationship of religion and political authority in Ancient Egypt.

 

 SSWH3 The student will examine the political, philosophical, and cultural interaction of Classical Mediterranean societies from 700 BCE to 400 CE.

a. Compare the origins and structure of the Greek polis, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire.

b. Identify the ideas and impact of important individuals; include Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and describe the diffusion of Greek culture by Aristotle’s pupil Alexander the Great and the impact of Julius and Augustus Caesar.

c. Analyze the contributions of Hellenistic and Roman culture; include law, gender, and science.

 

SSWH7 The student will analyze European medieval society with regard to culture, politics, society, and economics.

a. Explain the manorial system and feudalism; include the status of peasants and feudal monarchies and the importance of Charlemagne.

b. Describe the political impact of Christianity; include Pope Gregory VII and King Henry IV of Germany (Holy Roman Emperor).

 


 

LAW AND LEADERSHIP

Virtual Tours

American Revolution

Supreme Court Tour

http://www.oyez.org/tour

 U.S. Capitol Virtual Tour

http://www.senate.gov/vtour/

 Virtual Tour of the Vatican

http://vatican.arounder.com/

 U.S. Capitol Buildings (All in One Day!)

http://www.google.com/gadgets/directory?synd=earth&preview=on&cat=3d&url=http://maps.google.com/maps/gx%3Foe%3Dutf-8%26output%3Dghapi%26q%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fearth.google.com%252Fgallery%252Fkmz%252Fcapitolbuildings.kmz

 

 

 LAW AND LEADERSHIP

PROJECT:  CREATE A TRIAL BASED ON A NURSERY RHYME

     Nursery rhymes are a part of our childhood and have contributed to molding our society today.  Although they are an enjoyable read, and fun to memorize, they are often based on true historical events.  We are recreating and performing simulated trials in our class based on such fairy tales as Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Snow White vs. the Wicked Witch, and the Three Little Pigs vs. the Big Bad Wolf.  

     For our Law and Leadership project, I am asking that the students get into groups to create trials based on their favorite nursery rhymes.  Some suggested rhymes may be Humpty Dumpty, Mary Had a Little Lamb, and Little Jack Horner.  The students will research the crime committed in the nursery rhyme they choose to research, write it up in a way that can be presented in class and then perform the trial in the classroom as their culminating activity for the unit.  Much of the work for these plays will be done in the classroom, but students will probably want to get together to practice their performances.  Students will be graded on their performance based on rubrics.

     I am really looking forward to seeing the students’ creativity in action.  This project is designed to be a learning experience while the students have fun.  Part of the fun is writing the trial, but most of the fun will be deciding how to present it to their peers.  If you have any questions concerning this project, please call or email me. 

 

                                                          Connie Frank, SAGE Educator

                                                          Fairview Elementary